TOJ DraftSZN Presents Dylan’s Dimes: Draft Resolutions for Douglas

This week, we begin the 2022-23 season as Joe Douglas embarks on his third draft season with the New York Jets. Once again, Dylan’s Dimes takes a unique approach: I decided to give “Draft Resolutions” to Douglas and grant him some advice on how to approach a draft with four projected top 40 picks.

Resolution 1: Don’t Go Secondary With An Early Pick

Robert Saleh has proven to have a legitimate secondary development acumen. Looking back to his secondary in San Francisco, Saleh showed the ability to develop under the radar players and tailor them to fit his scheme. Look no further than Ahkello Witherspoon, who ranked as the sixth best CB by PFF in 2020 and started 33 games in his four seasons under Saleh. Jason Verrett was another example of development but, in his case, he joined Saleh later in his tenure and the former pro bowler resurrected his career to put together a strong 2020 season starting 13 games with two interceptions, 60 tackles and 7 PBUs. K’Waun Williams was a speedy slot corner who Saleh recognized could make plays in space and be dialed up as a blitzer. The list goes on and on, but in San Francisco Saleh made the most of what he had and then some.

Then, as a head coach, Saleh built a staff that could also bring the most out of young talent. The team drew some negative attention in the preseason for opting to take late round fliers to fill out their secondary rather than sign proven talent in free agency or address the position early. Instead, the team has trotted out Michael Carter Jr., Brandin Echols and Bryce Hall for the majority of this season. Carter has shown flashes of a capable starting slot cornerback for the future, while also flashing impressive instincts in key pass breakups or sacks like the one this past Sunday. Brandin Echols has racked up back to back interceptions in the past two weeks with one returned for a score against the Dolphins. He also has 8 PBUs and has proven to have the wheels to hang with some of the better vertical threats the team has faced this season. Perhaps the most impressive development can be seen in Bryce Hall, a late round flier from Douglas’s first draft class that has taken a huge step forward. With 16 PBUs and 78 tackles, Hall has shown range as a tackler and, although being beat at times, his coverage against top weapons from opposing teams has been incredibly encouraging. As a unit, although far from perfect with their 28th in pass defense ranking, the secondary has taken a massive step forward under Saleh and his staff’s leadership.

Prospects like Derek Stingley Jr. and Kyle Hamilton are tempting, and I believe both can be potential pro bowlers: however, with the developmental acumen that Saleh has shown and the depth of the defensive back class, if the team utilizes their inevitable top five pick on one of the two it would be disheartening. If the team opts to trade down to the middle or late first round and one of the top defensive backs on the board is there, then yes, it’s worth a thought. With the lack of depth and talent on this tea, though, Douglas should focus on adding blue chip prospects in areas like the edge rush, offensive line or receiving corps.

If the team can add depth to the secondary with later round picks and set out to develop them, that approach has been tried and somewhat true for Saleh. I also like the idea of adding a complimentary veteran in free agency similar to a lower tier outside swing like the 49ers took on Verrett to help aid Echols and Hall’s development. The area of priority for the Jets in the secondary needs to be safety though and, although a guy like Hamilton is tempting, this safety class is strong and adding depth to the room later in the draft to prevent bringing guys up from the practice squad week in and week out is a much better goal. Prioritizing positional value with their earlier selections and allowing Saleh’s developmental skills to shine should be an ideal for Douglas to continue upon in the 2022 draft.

Resolution 2: Address Previous Mistakes

Early returns of the 2021 draft class have been fruitful. Despite early hiccups, Zach Wilson has begun to take strides, go through his progressions at a quicker pace and show more confidence. When healthy, the trio of Alijah-Vera Tucker, Elijah Moore and Michael Carter have looked like franchise building blocks and future stars. I also mentioned Echols and Carter Jr. who have both shown flashes of being impact defensive backs for the squad moving forward.

Unfortunately, the 2020 draft has been hardly as successful. The team drafted a large mauler type left tackle in Mekhi Becton and passed on Tristan Wirfs, who has since become a pro bowler. Becton has shown glimpses of being a dominant tackle but has missed just about all of this season, went down in games last season, and proven to have a hard time staying conditioned. Denzel Mims, a second round pick from Baylor, has been an utter bust. Despite the young receiver showing up late in his rookie season, a bout with food poisoning and an inability to pick up the playbook has produced a season that’s seen him slide down the depth chart dramatically. In two seasons, Mims has 31 receptions for 490 yards and no touchdowns. He’s been a dud and a headache for the team, and moving on from him could be in the cards this offseason. This list goes on as Jabari Zuniga and James Morgan have been released, Cameron Clark got hurt over the summer, and Braden Mann has looked spotty in the punt game. Ashtyn Davis has come on in recent weeks and, with a legitimate compliment alongside him at safety, he could be salvageable. However, aside from Bryce Hall, the class has been disappointing. Now, Douglas holds ample capital to correct his mistakes, and he must choose to do so.

Resolution 3: Support Zach Wilson, Now and In the Future

The final resolution for Douglas is to prioritize the support of his young quarterback, now and down the road. The Jets have likely two picks in the top ten and four in the top 40. Trading down from those selections, even if not far, can help accumulate selections for future drafts, particularly the 2023 class that already has taken attention away from this one. Still, this team is one that can take a step forward by adding players in this draft as well. Getting more talent like AVT, Michael Carter and Elijah Moore that can grow with Wilson is crucial. Just like last year, this is a deep receiver class and the team could look to add one of the top guys there. I also think adding a tight end should be in the cards in order to accommodate Zach and aid his struggles to see the middle of the field. Overall, the priority needs to be on making sure Wilson can continue to grow, develop and have the most optimal situation for success.

TOJ’s DraftSZN Presents Dylan’s Dimes: New York Jets Mock Draft 1.0

Happy Holidays Jets Fans!

As we celebrate the holiday season, rather than do a traditional prospect breakdown I opted to do a mock draft featuring all nine of the Jets draft picks in the 2022 draft with no trades. This class would gift the Jets multiple blue chip prospects, high character guys, and future starters under their Christmas tree.

Pick #4: Kyle Hamilton S, Notre Dame

If the Jets remain in the fourth draft slot, both of the top two EDGE prospects would foreseeably be gone, and OT Evan Neal would likely go off the board as well. This leaves the Jets in a spot where they can still grab a top playmaker and, given the lack of safety depth and secondary playmakers, Kyle Hamilton would be an ideal pick here. Hamilton is an exceptional talent who can immediately come in and provide versatility as an instinctual run defender and a superb pass defender. Hamilton could have a Minkah Fitzpatrick level impact for the defense as a productive tackler. Also, with a division full of tight end talent, he can provide lock down coverage both there and in the slot when need be. Overall, Hamilton can immediately come in, make plays, improve the rush and pass defense, and take this defense up a few notches.

Pick #8: George Karlaftis EDGE, Purdue

The Jets double down on players from Greece in the first round (which has to be some kind of record) by selecting the “Greek Freak” George Karlaftis. Combining Karlaftis with Hamilton in the first two Jet selections would give the team two high-character, high-IQ guys who can be immediate difference makers. Karlaftis finished his collegiate career with 14 sacks and 29 TFLs over 16 games, but those numbers don’t even tell the full story. Karlaftis maneuvered men strategically to pull blocks away from teammates and still create pressures while facing double teams. He’s gritty too and can be a major asset in run defense as well. Karlaftis is the kind of smart disrupter who would compliment a returning Carl Lawson perfectly. Having that explosive and disruptive pass rushing tandem could take the pressure off the secondary and allow the team to rush four comfortably with JFM, Quinnen Williams and others in the fold as well. Karlaftis would be a home run addition who could help give the Jets one of their best potential pass rushing attacks in decades.

Pick #35: Zion Johnson IOL, Boston College

Johnson is a safe prospect with a high floor that will likely lead him to rise in this class. Johnson is someone who could immediately start and not need much time to develop. He’s not a high ceiling guy admittedly, but he’s a quality run blocker and efficient pass blocker. He won’t be the best offensive lineman on a line, but he’s a smart and durable prospect that could give the Jets an answer at right guard and allow the team to move away from the revolving door of veterans.

Pick #40: David Bell WR, Purdue

Bell brings the Joe Douglas second round wide receiver selection total to three receivers in three draft classes. Bell can help compliment Elijah Moore and take a lot of the pressure off of him. Bell has proven to excel in yards after the catch, garner consistent separation on the outside, and he’s shown the versatility that would compliment Moore and Corey Davis’s skill sets well. Davis and Bell could hold the outside receiver spots down and allow Moore to play the DeeBoo Samuel role where he takes snaps all over the offense. Bell could fit the Brandon Aiyuk role where he takes snaps all over like Moore at times, but can also stretch the field as a deep outside threat. Bell would help accomplish the ultimate task of taking pressure off of Zach Wilson and, although there’s better receiver prospects who could fit this offense better, Bell could come in and provide another weapon in Wilson’s arsenal.

Pick #68: Brandon Smith LB, Penn State

The Jets go to linebacker university in State College, Pennsylvania to grab a linebacker with starting potential. Smith can be a reliable pass defender and productive tackler, but he needs to reign in his overzealousness that often makes him susceptible to missed tackles, and he can stand to benefit from technical advancements as a tackler as well. Robert Saleh develops defensive backs and linebackers well though and Saleh could fix a lot of the flaws in Smith’s game relatively quickly, potentially molding him into a starter at some point in the next two seasons. For now though, Smith could work himself into playing time relatively quickly as he develops into a more well rounded linebacker, likely at the SAM or WILL spot.

Pick #110: Cade Otton TE, Washington

The Jets have been bereft of a legitimate tight end for over a decade. Otton has the potential develop into the tight end that fills that void and he’s right up Joe Douglas’s alley. He’s won every team award you could win at Washington, including the Most Inspirational Athlete award. Otton’s a captain, outstanding blocker, and someone who could immediately be a redzone threat. Otton works the middle of the field well and reigns in contested catches and would quickly become a favorite option for Zach Wilson. Otton’s only large concerns are how he comes back from a serious foot injury and how he grows as a receiver at the next level, something I see him doing somewhat seamlessly.

Pick #121: Tariq Woolen CB, UTSA

Woolen is another Day 3 flier by Joe Douglas at the cornerback position. Woolen is a lengthy cornerback at 6’4” and he’s also a converted Wide Receiver who tracks the ball very well. As a former pass catcher who is still learning the cornerback position Woolen is extremely raw, but his length and playmaking ability are appealing traits that could catch the eye of the Jets brass. His traits make him a desirable prospect who could add more depth and a playmaker to a cornerback room that saw its first interception come in Week 15, while providing high upside down the line.

Pick #145: Tyler Allgeier RB, BYU

Allgeier is someone you have to listen to this week’s “Draft SZN” episode to get the full feel for. He’s a high motor back who explodes through gaps and has the size to break tackles consistently. He has good contact balance and his gritty running style reminds me of Ryan Matthews. Just like Matthews, Allgeier could add depth to the running back room and provide a perfect counter attack to Michael Carter.

Pick #158: Tyler Vrabel OT, Boston College

Vrabel rounds out the bunch as a prospect with a fun story. Vrabel is the son of Tennessee Titans Head Coach and former player Mike Vrabel. He comes from a smart football family and his football IQ is high. Vrabel has really good foot work, a strong frame and impressive agility. His length and athleticism make him a developmental tackle prospect who could be molded into a starter somewhere down the line. He struggles to hold blocks and maintain balance, but the traits are there for Vrabel to become a competent starter at some point.

TOJ’s DraftSZN Presents Dylan’s Dimes: Postseason Week One Edition

Bowl games have begun and with the college football postseason in full gear, it’s time for another week of Dylan’s Dimes!

Introduction:

Dylan’s Dimes will be a ten step breakdown of three of the biggest draft eligible players taking the field in some of the biggest matchups each week. I analyze background, on the field performance, off the field traits, opinions around the NCAA, all leading up to the dropping the dime on how they could fit with gang green.

1/10-The Prospects:

Despite the Washington Huskies rocky season, one player’s continued success is a major takeaway. This player received All-Pac-12 honors in the 2020 season and has grown into both a success on and off the field. Now this versatile tight end with exceptional potential will make for an interesting prospect as he prepares for the 2021 draft, he is TE, Cade Otton. 

A recently named first team All-American safety has all the talent to be a star safety at the next level. Not to mention he’s got an absurdly high football IQ and is currently an architect of Alabama’s successful defense for the second straight season. This player is S, Jordan Battle.

Rounding us out this week is an absolute monster of a man. He towers over and throttles opposing competition. Not only that, but despite his size he’s a strong athlete and incredibly intelligent player. This week’s final player going through the wringer is OL, Daniel Faalele.

2/10-The Measurables:

Otton

-Height: 6’5”

-Weight: 250lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: Tumwater, WA

Battle

-Height: 6’1”

-Weight: 210lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: Fort Lauderdale, FL

Faalele

-Height: 6’9”

-Weight: 380lbs

-Year: Senior

-From: Melbourne, Australia

3/10-The Background:

Otton:

Cade Otton was an all-state recipient playing tight end, linebacker and long snapper for Tumwater High School. Otton had 107 tackles, 10 TFLs and 3 sacks in his senior year, as well as setting school records with 95 receptions, 1,705 yards and 33 touchdowns. Otton played basketball as well. Otton was rankęd as ESPN’s No.22 TE in the nation. Otton ultimately decided to stay in state and attend Washington where he earned awards such as “Ultimate Bird Dawg”, “Most Outstanding Freshman” and the offensive MVP in 2020. This year Otton received the award for Most Inspirational, the most prestigious honor that Washington dons out each year.

Battle:

Jordan Battle was a highly touted safety prospect from St. Thomas Aquinas High School. Battle was ranked as one of the top 100 prospects in the country by ESPN and one of the top five safeties in the nation. Battle had 27 tackles, a TFL, a sack and 3 INTs in his senior year. Battle also played basketball in high school. Battle quickly worked his way into the defensive back rotation, earning four starts in his freshman year. Battle won a national title in 2020 and played a key role in the Crimson Tide’s success. This season, he helped lead the Tide to the playoff and he was recently recognized as an All-American for his contributions.

Faalele:

Daniel Faalele was born in Melbourne, Australia before coming to the states and enrolling at IMG Academy. In his first season playing in 2017, Faalele helped lead the team to an undefeated campaign. He was ranked the No.22 OT in the nation and received a bid to the Under Armour All America Game. Despite playing just two seasons, Faalele received interest from a handful of top programs before choosing to play for PJ Fleck and the Gophers. Faalele started the last eight games of his freshman year and hasn’t looked back. 

4/10-The Performance:

Statistics:

Otton:

2020: 4 games, 18 receptions, 258 yards, 14.3 YPC and 3 TDs.

2021: 8 games, 28 receptions, 250 yards, 8.9 YPC and 1 TD.

Battle:

2020: 12 games, 66 tackles, 3.0 TFLs, 1 INT, 1 TD and 4 PDs.

2021: 13 games, 74 tackles, 1.0 TFL, 3 INTs, 2 TDs and 3 PDs.

Faalele:

2020: *Opted out due to COVID-19*

2021: Started and played in 11 of 11 games.

5/10-The Good:

Otton:

Otton is a team first guy, that’s part of the reason he was a captain of the team. Another reason is because Otton is not afraid to get dirty, he’s a physical tight end and a more than willing blocker. Otton’s athleticism allowed him to be the lead blocker in a handful of big plays, and his physicality allowed him to take down men larger than him. Otton also has the ideal mold of skills to have immense success as a receiver at the next level. He’s proven to be a high IQ receiver with advanced route running and exceptional body control. Otton also handled 50/50 balls really well and even showed some examples of fighting for and gaining legitimate yards after the catch.

Battle:

Battle is a playmaker in every meaning of the word. Battle has three touchdowns to this point, constantly tracks the ball and tries to disrupt the play, lays his body on the line to make explosive plays and flies all over the field. Battle has a high football IQ and showed the ability to read the offense well on many occasions. Battle also has proven he has the ability to play in the slot, as a centerfielder, in the box and even at cornerback. He’s got the versatility to do a little bit of everything and the intelligence to match it.

Faalele:

Faalele is a mountain of a man. His combination of length and strength have made him a force to be reckoned with. His length allows him to keep separation well initially, and his strength packs a massive punch that rocks the defender enough to stop him in his tracks. Faalele is relentless and aggressive in run blocking and his size makes him the ideal anchor of an offensive line. His athleticism is promising as he does have good agility that shows up in tape.

6/10-The Bad:

Otton:

The bad with Otton is simply a lack of proven production. You see evidence of a guy who has the skills to be a talented receiver, but then the stats barely catch your eye. Otton stretches the field well and finds crafty ways to garner separation, but his speed is not going to let him breakaway on pure athleticism, and he will have to rely on his technique to have substantial success in that regard. Lastly, Otton’s weight tends to fluctuate and getting above the 255 pound mark could be a good playing weight for him in the future.

Battle:

Battle is an overzealous and not very technical tackler. Battle loves to swing for the fences and try to make a big play and just like home run hitters in the MLB, his strikeout rate can be high. Battle has been guilty of failing to wrap up and missing tackles, something that could be a detriment at the next level. To follow that up, his timing can be off at times, as another fallback of his home run hitting play style, and this can cause missed opportunities for turnovers or pass breakups at points.

Faalele:

Similar to another international player who has limited experience in David Ojabo, the two of them are both raw players who will require hands on coaching. Faalele, although a solid athlete, has significant balance control issues and with his weight, that could be a potential concern for injuries in the long term. Faalele has issues with diagnosing more advanced pass rush moves and handling more fluid pass rushers. He also doesn’t use his hands as effectively as you’d like. 

7/10-The Focus of Improvement:

Otton: Production

Battle: Tackling

Faalele: Continue to Show Growth

8/10-The Potential:

Otton:

Otton is willing to put the team first to have success and that’s really encouraging. Otton is willing to do the hard part of the job and enjoys doing it. He’s humble and intelligent and his presence is one many will gravitate towards. As a receiver, there’s room to improve and the hope is he shows a production jump when he gets to the pros. Otton has the mold to be at the very least, a player that commands significant playing time in a tight end rotation, and his ceiling could be a potential starter in his own right. 

Battle:

Battle is coming from an NFL prospect production factory, and what he’s learned will allow him to thrive at the next level. Battle is instinctual and has grown as a leader and a reader (of the defense). Battle needs to improve his tackling and get more consistent. If he can rein that part of his game in and limit the overzealousness, Battle has a chance to be a starter at the next level, and quickly.

Faalele:

Faalele is a safe bet to eventually be a starter at the next level. His size is going to make teams jump for joy and even small glimpses of his athleticism will make a team want to mold him into a top right tackle. Faalele’s landing spot will be the biggest way of gauging his potential, if he lands with a hands on coach who can educate Faalele, then the sky’s the limit and Faalele could be a franchise right tackle. If he lands in the wrong spot though, his size and athleticism could be null and void. 

9/10-The Outside Opinion:

Otton:

“If there’s a better tight end in the country, I’d like to see him.”- Former UW Head Coach Jimmy Lake

“Presumably, Otton’s next stop is April’s NFL draft, where he should be a middle- to high-round draft pick. He’s considered an elite blocker for his position, as well as a proficient receiver.”- Dan Raley, Sports Illustrated

Battle:

“Whichever team drafts him is getting a day one starter, who will know the ins and outs of the defense. Battle can be relied on to be a defensive captain for the next decade.”- Jack Borowsky, Sports Illustrated 

Faalele:

“With size, strength, decent relative athleticism, competitive toughness, and some impressive technical ability, Faalele belies his relative inexperience to be an alluring 2022 NFL Draft prospect.”- Oliver Hodgkinson, Pro Football Network

10/10-The Fit:

Otton:

Otton would be a strong addition to the team. The team has little to no talent at tight end and adding someone who could be an asset as a blocker and has the mold to be a strong receiver would be ideal. Otton excels over the middle and with 50/50 balls. Zach Wilson needs more weapons over the middle of the field to make him comfortable and give him cop outs. Wilson also loves to throw contested balls and Otton’s length makes him a perfect fit for Wilson’s play style. Otton is also a high character guy, and captain, something Joe Douglas values immensely. Otton should be gone in the late second to early third round and if the Jets find him on their board with their second, second round selection or their third, he is worth the look as his value and upside could be alluring.

Battle:

Jordan Battle is a fun player who will immediately draw attention across the league. His talent on and off the field will make him a likely high selection. Battle could make sense with the New York Jets, but his value could end up being the reason they stay away. Battle has the skills and the IQ to be a first rounder and if the Jets trade down or he falls to the second then they should think about adding him, otherwise Battle is not worth a top 15 pick. Battle is a good fit based on both his versatility and his play making ability. Couple that with the lack of safety depth on the roster and he could make a lot of sense, but based on where he will likely be selected, it’s hard to see him landing in the Green & White.

Faalele:

The Jets spent a high selection on a large lineman who had balance issues but all the potential in the world in Joe Douglas’s first draft as general manager. Mekhi Becton has missed significant time and struggled to recover from injuries or stay in shape. The talent is there, but the durability is not. Now, adding Faalele would be another large man who has balance issues and could spawn injury concerns. Pair that with his inexperience and what would need to be taught and the fit doesn’t make a lot of sense. Faalele has taken big steps up this season and he has been relatively durable, but the NFL is a whole new ballgame and I don’t think the Jets will be able to prepare or coach him well enough for both parties to get a worthwhile return on investment. 

TOJ’s DraftSZN Presents Dylan’s Dimes: Week 11 Edition

The Jets continued their stretch of poor defensive performances in a 45-17 loss to the Buffalo Bills. The defense looked lifeless and, for the fourth week in a row, gave up over 34 points. Three of those four games saw the opposing team put up more than 40 points. The Jets lack talent on defense but, luckily, any of these three players could immediately make an impact on this defense.

Introduction:

Dylan’s Dimes will be a ten step breakdown of three of the biggest draft eligible players taking the field in some of the biggest matchups each week. I analyze background, on the field performance, off the field traits, opinions around the NCAA, all leading up to the dropping the dime on how they could fit with gang green.

1/10-The Prospects:

Leading off this week is a core piece of the top team in the nation. His athleticism and versatility has allowed the No.1 Georgia Bulldogs to use him in a variety of packages. He is mr. unlimited, LB, Nakobe Dean.

The Utah football program has excelled this season and as they come off a massive win against No.3 Oregon, they are going to count on their defense to keep them in a competitive game. The heart and soul of that defense this season has been LB, Devin Lloyd, the second player going through the wringer this week.

Rounding out the pack this week is an athletic and ferocious edge rusher from the University of South Carolina. He’s a game wrecker capable of disrupting the play constantly. That player is DE, Kingsley Enagbare.

2/10-The Measurables:

Dean:

-Height: 6’0”

-Weight: 225lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: Horn Lake, MS

Lloyd:

-Height: 6’3”

-Weight: 235lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: Chula Vista, CA

Enagbare:

-Height: 6’4”

-Weight: 260lbs

-Year: Senior

-From: Atlanta, GA

3/10-The Background:

Dean:

Dean graduated from Horn Lake High School in Mississippi. While there, Dean played four sports, track, baseball, basketball, and football. Dean played both sides of the ball, but garnered attention as one of the nation’s top linebackers. In 2018, he received the High School Butkus award as the top linebacker in the country. He was a 2019 All-American game participant and after receiving loads of interest from seemingly every top program, Dean opted to attend Georgia. At Georgia, it’s been a story of constant development. As Dean has learned the scheme, adapted to tougher competition and utilized his athleticism in various facets, Dean has become a top defensive player in the nation.

Lloyd:

Where Nakobe Dean was a highly touted high school prospect, Lloyd was not. Lloyd had a quieter high school career, playing both sides of the football as well. Lloyd excelled in coverage and projected more as a safety at the next level. Lloyd received one power five offer, from Utah, where he ultimately committed. At Utah, Lloyd sat behind his elders, learned the linebacker position and grew into one of the top players in the PAC-12, and now the country.

Enagbare:

Kingsley Enagbare has always been someone who drew attention. He’s a gifted player, but above all else he’s a talented athlete. At Hapeville Charter Academy, he put on a show week in and week out. As a senior he was honored with the Class AA Defensive Player of the Year by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Enagbare garnered interest from a few schools before opting to join the Gamecocks in South Carolina. Enagbare has not put up the same eye catching numbers as others in the class, but make no mistake his impact is always prevalent.

4/10-The Performance:

Statistics:

Dean:

2020: 10 games, 71 tackles, 1.5 TFLs and 1.5 sacks.

2021: 11 games, 50 tackles, 7.0 TFLs, 4.5 sacks, 2 INTs, 1 TD and a FF.

Lloyd:

2020: 5 games, 48 tackles, 10.0 TFLs, 2.0 sacks and a FF.

2021: 11 games, 91 tackles, 21.0 TFLs, 6.0 sacks, 3 INTs, 1 TD, 1 FR and a FF.

Enagbare:

2020: 8 games, 30 tackles, 7.0 TFLs, 6.0 sacks and 2 forced fumbles.

2021: 11 games, 41 tackles, 7.0 TFLs, 4.5 sacks, a forced fumble and a recovery.

5/10-The Good:

Dean:

It’s hard to poke a lot of holes in a player as well rounded as Nakobe Dean. On the field Dean plays with elite level tackling range, incredible play speed and excels in coverage as a linebacker. As a former safety, his athleticism is apparent as he plays the linebacker position in a way that few can. He flies all over the field with a high motor that’s constantly present. Dean anchors one of the top defenses in the country, and he’s been touted by many as the glue of the defense, and a top tier leader. On and off the field, Dean brings a lot of good to the table.

Lloyd:

Devin Lloyd is a true defensive captain. His communication and football intelligence is up there with some of the best. He provides a high enough football IQ to make up for athletic advantages players like Nakobe Dean may have over him. His reads are incredibly impressive and his versatility allows him to constantly take advantage of mismatches. Lloyd is a strong pass rusher, very good in coverage and excellent in run support. He can do just about everything you ask of him, and those types of players are a dime in a dozen.

Enagbare:

The first and most conclusive takeaway I had on who Kingsley Enagbare is as a player is the statement that I jotted down in my notes after just a few minutes of watching film. That statement is “all out, all the time”. Every play, no matter if he gets beat at the line, Enagbare does not give up. His motor is outstanding, he’s a hard hitter, his pass rush moves are strong, his bullrush is impressive and his run defense is generally very good. He’s a high instinct player who plays with constant swagger. Enagbare is a physical specimen capable of wrecking a game at any given moment.

6/10-The Bad:

Dean:

Dean is an excellent run defender, but his impact in the passing game is lackluster at points. Dean utilizes his coverage abilities well, but he struggles to impact the game as a pass rusher, he fails to read passing plays as well as others in the class. Dean is slightly undersized, but that can be overcome. Overall, Dean is still a very good player, but his ability to affect the passing game could improve.

Lloyd:

Lloyd does a lot of things really well, there are just some aspects of his game that could stand to improve. His footwork is inconsistent and it puts him at a disadvantage at points. He can be overzealous and a little too aggressive and can tend to disregard patience and try to make a big play. These are two big aspects of his game that could be refined to make him a more well developed prospect.

Enagbare:

This class is very deep with edge rushing talent, and a lot of the top tier guys in this class have put up big numbers. Enagbare reminds me of Odafe Oweh and how his athleticism showed that he could be a bigger producer at the next level. The problem with athletic freaks like Enagbare and Oweh is they can be hit or miss. Enagbare can still impact the game no matter what the stat sheet says, but proven production goes a long way at the next level and you run the risk that doesn’t develop with Enagbare.

7/10-The Focus of Improvement:

Dean: Impact the Passing Game

Lloyd: Skills Refinement

Enagbare: Improve Production

8/10-The Potential:

Dean:

The Isaiah Simmons comparisons are going to flood in from now until April. Dean is a safety/linebacker hybrid who can be used in a variety of packages and schemes. Dean is a non scheme specific Swiss army knife. If used the right way Dean has potential to be a long term starter at the next level. If he struggles to find a fit, like Simmons he could get off to a slow start at first. The potential is there though and Dean will fare well at the next level.

Lloyd:

Where Dean provides non traditional hybrid versatility, Lloyd provides positional versatility that can allow him to provide value in a multitude of schemes. Lloyd is a confident player with high football I.Q. who will transition very well to the NFL. Lloyd is an instinctual playmaker who can reach a pro bowl potential. Lloyd is a safe bet to be a long term starter, with a ceiling of being a pro bowler year in and year out.

Enagbare:

I see Enagbare fitting that Oweh style I mentioned above where he produces higher at the NFL level than he did in college. His relentless motor, intelligence and size and speed make him an easy bet to be a rotational pass rusher immediately. From there, Enagbare can become a long term starter over time.

9/10-The Outside Opinion:

Dean:

“Nakobe Dean simply has everything that it takes to be a very good linebacker in the NFL and he’s already proven it at the college level. There are a few other linebackers who deserve LB1 consideration in the 2022 NFL Draft like Alabama’s Christian Harris and Utah’s Devin Lloyd, however as of now I give Dean the edge.”- Evan Bachman, Fansided

Lloyd:

“Lloyd projects as a starting weakside linebacker early on in his career as his coverage ability, length and athleticism are what NFL teams desire at the position. Whether he can develop into a quality starter is dependent on him improving as a run defender. Defensive coordinators can move Lloyd around and allow his defense to disguise looks if required.” -Lorenz Leinweber, Sports Illustrated

Enagbare:

“When he hits, he hits hard. Those abilities — combined with a violent disposition — make him a danger to quarterbacks across the nation.”-Oliver Hodgkinson, Pro Football Network

10/10-The Fit:

Dean:

Dean does things your traditional linebacker just shouldn’t do. Being able to hang with running backs, receivers and tight ends and legitimately hold your own is something few players could do. Dean can play like a safety, but also excel as a captain of the defense. He’s instinctual and picks and chooses when to attack or drop back. His versatility is going to suit him well in terms of overall value, but for the Jets, Dean might not be a better fit than Lloyd. For the Jets, Dean’s versatility could actually be a gift and a curse. His athleticism and IQ can allow him to thrive in a variety of packages, and Robert Saleh would assuredly have fun using him all over. With Lloyd though, you know you are getting someone who can immediately slot in the ideal role Saleh wants his linebackers to play. Dean wouldn’t necessarily fit as well as Lloyd in that respect, but if Saleh is looking to add the better athlete and weapon, then he will push Joe Douglas to go for Dean over Lloyd.

Lloyd:

Both Dean and Lloyd are exceptional talents, but for the Jets, Lloyd may get the edge. Lloyd plays a more traditional MIKE role but adds versatility as a pass rusher. Not only that, but his abilities in coverage will open things up for Robert Saleh to use him in a variety of different ways in his scheme. Lloyd plays similar to Fred Warner and Bobby Wagner, two guys who Saleh has coached and seen the impact they can have on a game. Adding Lloyd could give the Jets a young anchor to the defense. The only qualm could be C.J. Mosley, given his high cap hit, it will be hard to move on, plus, he’s played very well this year. Mosley could move over to a WILL role or a different role that allows Lloyd to play more comfortably and the Jets to still utilize Mosley’s talents.

Enagbare:

Enagbare is a freak athlete with disruptive abilities reminiscent of the guy he would play opposite of. Carl Lawson has never been a monster sack producer, but he’s constantly a league leader in pressures. Enagbare has not been a big producer in college, but he constantly causes disruption, and having two players capable of disrupting the play constantly is a huge asset. Enagbare can solidify a strong duo of the edge with Lawson that could open things up for the rest of the defense. For a team that’s lacked a true pass rusher for decades, having two would be a treat.

TOJ’s DraftSZN Presents Dylan’s Dimes: Week 12 Edition

It’s rivalry week in college football. With games that will undoubtedly shape the postseason landscape, it’s time to take a closer look at three players who could be the biggest catalysts to their team’s success, in what will likely be their final seasons before heading to the next level. 

Introduction:

Dylan’s Dimes will be a ten step breakdown of three of the biggest draft eligible players taking the field in some of the biggest matchups each week. I analyze background, on the field performance, off the field traits, opinions around the NCAA, all leading up to the dropping the dime on how they could fit with gang green.

1/10-The Prospects:

We start this week with a prospect who’s shot on to scouts radars across the country after putting together a fantastic senior season to this point. He’s well traveled, born in Nigeria, spending time in Scotland and New Jersey before landing in Michigan. His next step will likely be the NFL, leading off this week is DE, David Ojabo.

Back to back from the Big House, as the Michigan Wolverines prepare to take on Ohio State in their biggest game of the season, shutting down C.J. Stroud will be imperative. Although Ojabo and Aiden Hutchinson will be tasked with disrupting, the burden of breaking up the pass and making plays will fall on a top defensive back and the second player going through the gauntlet this week, DB, Daxton Hill.

An incredible athlete, this player was heavily recruited before committing to Ohio State. After fighting to earn reps behind prospects Chris Olave and Garrett Wilson, this player opted to transfer and quickly has made a name for himself at Alabama. As one of Bryce Young’s preferred targets, he’s made a massive impact for the Tide, and projects to be a member of a loaded receiver class if he chooses to declare. The third and final player going through the wringer this week is WR, Jameson Williams.

2/10-The Measurables:

Ojabo:

-Height: 6’5”

-Weight: 250lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: Aberdeen, Scotland

Hill:

-Height: 6’0”

-Weight: 192lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: Tulsa, OK

Williams:

-Height: 6’2”

-Weight: 189lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: St Louis, MO

3/10-The Background:

Ojabo:

As I noted before, Ojabo has been well traveled. Ojabo was born in Nigeria and lived there for 7 years before moving to Aberdeen, Scotland. From there, Ojabo moved to New Jersey to attend high school in the United States. As a freak athlete, he played soccer and basketball in his first two years at Blair Academy before joining the football team in his junior year. He immediately made an impact posting 35 tackles, 6.0 sacks and two forced fumbles in his first year. He then followed that up with another excellent season garnering attention from Clemson, Notre Dame, Penn State and other top programs. Ultimately, Ojabo chose Michigan where he’s become a key player in the past two seasons.

Hill:

Hill attended Booker T. Washington for four years, posting some incredible statistics as a receiver and defensive back. Hill lit it up his senior year though, catching 13 passes for 360 yards and 7 touchdowns. Hill added 93 tackles, 9 TFLs, a sack, two interceptions, three forced fumbles and a fumble recovery. He was named Gatorade Player of the Year in Oklahoma and top prospect in the state. He received loads of attention from every top school before choosing to commit to Michigan where he made an impact from day one. Hill took snaps at safety and special teams, worked up to a starting role and has been an anchor of the defense since.

Williams:

Williams had an exceptional junior and senior year at Cardinal Ritter College Prep. In his junior season, Williams had 1,062 yards and 15 touchdowns. Then senior year he had 1,626 yards and 22 touchdowns. Williams, an incredible athlete, won two state titles in track and field as well. Williams was heavily recruited and initially committed to Ohio State. Williams sat behind Garret Wilson and Chris Olave and fought to garner reps before transferring to Alabama where he made an impact the minute he stepped on campus.

4/10-The Performance:

2020 & 2021 Statistics:

Ojabo:

2020: 1 game and 1 tackle (played most snaps on special teams)

2021: 11 games, 30 tackles, 10.0 TFLs, 10.0 sacks, 5 forced fumbles and a fumble recovery.

Hill:

2020: 6 games, 44 tackles and an interception.

2021: 11 games, 53 tackles, 3.5 TFLs, .5 sacks, 2 interceptions and a fumble recovery.

Williams:

2020: 6 games, 9 receptions, 154 yards, 17.1 yards per reception and 2 TDs.

2021: 11 games, 59 receptions, 1,218 yards, 20.6 yards per reception and 13 TDs.

5/10-The Good:

Ojabo:

As a superb athlete, Ojabo uses that athleticism to constantly disrupt the game whenever he steps on the field. His athleticism allows him to close and he has absurd range. He has burst like he is constantly is shot out of a cannon, and he never stops until the play is dead. He’s strong and his combination of size and speed make him a nightmare for opposing offenses. He’s truly one of the most gifted athletes in this class and his athletic potential is unmatched.

Hill:

Speaking of gifted Michigan athletes, Hill is another. Hill has truly expanded his role this season and shown all he’s capable of in both rush defense and coverage. In run defense, he’s an explosive athlete with excellent closing ability. In coverage, Hill excels in the centerfielder role, with the speed to keep up with anyone and make an impact on the play consistently, Hill reads the eyes of the opposing quarterback very well and finds ways to limit the passer as he runs through his progressions. 

Williams:

If a team is looking for a bonafide game wrecking deep threat with 4.3 speed, look no further. Jameson Williams is a game wrecker. Williams has good hands, excellent timing in how he breaks his routes, good concentration and constantly makes a play with the ball in his hands. His explosive play style will draw loads of attention from now until draft day, and the Tyreek Hill game breaking ability comparisons will be inevitable. 

6/10-The Bad:

Ojabo:

For Ojabo the biggest concern is his inexperience. Ojabo is still incredibly fresh in football years. Although he’s showed advancement over time, he doesn’t have the same football IQ as other top edge rushers in the class. Ojabo’s pass rush moves aren’t as advanced and his hand use and the angles he takes show a player who is still fairly raw.

Hill:

Hill has shown advancement in play recognition, but especially in run defense, he will need to show growth. Often times, given the explosiveness of the Wolverines pass rush and their incredible talent, Hill doesn’t have to be counted on as often as other defensive backs in the country. In man to man situations, and as he faced tougher competition, Hill will struggle with 50/50 balls, as although he can disrupt, he struggles to make the big play when need be. Refinement in recognition and improved playmaking could take Hill to the next level as a prospect.

Williams:

Williams isn’t the most refined route runner, and it shows at points. Williams is a deep threat, but his frame is skinny and he will struggle to reel in contested catches especially against larger defenders at the next level. Some will pigeon hole Williams as a prototypical deep threat, and he will have to show a lot in pre draft interviews to show he can match up mentally with some of the best of a loaded receiver class. Advancing his route tree and adding more layers to his route running like fakes and crisper cuts could give him another dimension to his game. 

7/10-The Focus of Improvement:

Ojabo: Continue To Show Growth

Hill: Playmaking

Williams: Route Running Advancement 

8/10-The Potential:

Ojabo:

Ojabo has incredibly high potential. The player I saw against Penn State live is the kind of player who could wreck games at the next level. Ojabo will have to show advancement in his pass rushing moves and football IQ, but if he can, he can be a true three down player at the next level. His athleticism will make him a player who could fit in almost any scheme, and his value will be through the roof. If he can be coached up properly, the sky truly is the limit for Ojabo.

Hill:

Hill is an exceptional athlete with versatility capable of making him a fit in most defenses. I think Hill will thrive more as a centerfielder style safety, although not a liability in coverage, his timing and ability to make legitimate plays on the ball leave a little to be desired. If he finds the right fit, Hill could be a long term starter at the next level. 

Williams:

Williams could be an exceptional weapon at the next level. At 6’2”, 192lbs, Williams will fit the versatile undersized deep threat role that guys like former Alabama product Jaylen Waddle. Although not as technically gifted as Waddle or as well rounded as Devonta Smith, Williams will provide versatility as he could play both slot and outside. He will likely begin as a wide receiver four with potential to be a starter regardless of scheme at the next level.

9/10-The Outside Opinion:

Ojabo:

“Ojabo has been one of the most impressive newcomers in the country this season…while Ojabo needs to work on his all-around game, there’s a lot to like. He’s still young; he could develop into an elite edge rusher.”- Mel Kiper, ESPN

Hill:

“He’s an athletic anomaly, who’s developed into a true football player this year, not just an incredible athlete who happens to play the sport. As he continues to develop, the sky is the limit and his stock is certainly trending in the right direction.”- Daniel Griffis, USA Today

Williams:

“So could Jameson Williams push for round 1 in the 2022 NFL Draft? The formula is there. His long speed, short area burst, flexibility, stop/start quickness, and ability to separate quickly make the case. We know how much NFL teams like speed in receiver prospects, so it’s not a wild proposition.”- Jacob Schyvinck, FANSIDED

10/10-The Fit:

Ojabo:

In David Ojabo, I see a versatile athlete capable of growing into a force at the next level. He’s a stand up individual with the general intelligence and drive to truly learn and refine his craft over time. Players like that are blue chip character guys and prospects. His scheme fit might not necessarily be as straight forward as it would be with other teams, but with the Jets he could get a very good chance to work alongside Carl Lawson, a formidable disruptor and defensive linemen like Quinnen Williams and John Franklin-Myers who excel at bull rushing. Ojabo could garner less attention and use his athleticism to work off right tackles for the time being. Adding an athletic rusher like Ojabo is appealing as truthfully, the more athletes with the ability to play multiple roles, the better, especially in a defense like this that is so void of talent.

Hill:

Hill’s fit, especially based on where he will be valued could make it more difficult to project him to the Jets. Hill could be a good fit for the team strictly as a player as the team needs more talent at the safety position. Ashtyn Davis has taken strides in the centerfielder role, and the team could rely on him to continue to grow and look to add a strong safety type alongside him. If that’s the case, Hill isn’t there guy. If the team opts to go with two athletic safeties and utilize them in different packages, then Hill could possibly be an option. Ultimately, Hill will likely go in the first or second round, and although the team has a plethora of picks in those two rounds, there are other positions that project as bigger needs.

Williams:

On “Draft SZN” this week, we debated how exactly the Jets could best situate Elijah Moore to open things up for him more. Adding someone like Jameson Williams could be the perfect way to do that. Williams could work outside just like Moore, and allow Moore to split time in the slot and in handoff/RPO style packages as well, where they both could be of use. Adding a player like Williams could give the Jets a dynamic duo of two exceptional athletes with game wrecking abilities. Zach Wilson is also a quarterback who thrives with outside threats and tends to struggle reading the middle of the field, giving him more options to suit his play style could take a load of pressure off. The only concerns are Williams likely being drafted too high for the Jets to justify another high pick on a receiver, and a lack of size in the receiving corps. 

TOJ DraftSZN Presents Dylan’s Dimes: Week 9 Edition

This week features one of the most integral pieces of the top team in college football, a lineman who received his conference’s award for, “Most Feared Offensive Lineman” and a defensive end trying to make a case for the top defensive player in the class. Their one commonality? They could all be difference makers for the New York Jets

Introduction:

Dylan’s Dimes will be a ten step breakdown of three of the biggest draft eligible players taking the field in some of the biggest matchups each week. I analyze background, on the field performance, off the field traits, opinions around the NCAA, all leading up to the dropping the dime on how they could fit with gang green.

1/10-The Prospects:

Kicking us off this week is an absolute mammoth of a man. In today’s NFL, the role of powerful, run stuffing defensive tackles are severely underrated. For #1 Georgia, the man filling that role in their defense has been paramount to their immense success. Jordan Davis, the man anchoring one of the top defensive lines in the nation, and arguably the top defensive tackle in this class will be the first player highlighted this week.

Next up is one of the top offensive lineman in this year’s draft class, one of the top run blockers in the class, and his violent play style should transition relatively nicely to the next level. As a part of an NC State team that’s played competitive football this year, Ikem Ekwnou can be credited for a large portion of the offensive line’s success. As he looks to take the next step in his career, he’ll be the second player going through the wringer this week.

Despite losing to #3 Michigan State, #7 Michigan has had a very strong season to this point. Their defense has been explosive and, when their offense has found their rhythm, they’ve been one of the best teams in college football. One of the driving forces behind their defense’s success this season, and really during his entire tenure at Michigan, has been Aidan Hutchinson. Hutchinson is a guy a lot of Jets fans love, and he’ll be the final player getting broken down this week.

2/10-The Measurables:

Davis:

-Height: 6’6”

-Weight: 330 lbs

-Year: Senior

-From: Charlotte, NC

Ekwonu

-Height: 6’4”

-Weight: 320 lbs

-Year: Junior

-From: Charlotte, NC

Hutchinson:

-Height: 6’6″

-Weight: 265 lbs

-Year: Senior

-From: Dearborn, MI

3/10-The Background:

Davis:

In high school, Davis began as a forward on the Hopewell high school basketball team before transferring to Mallard Creek where he joined football and continued playing basketball. According to his coaches, Davis started as a shy giant, quietly wrecking havoc. As he grew as a player, he also grew as a leader: his coach even said that “as he got more confidence as an individual, especially when it came to football, he was great.” Davis grew on and off the field and scouts took notice. Davis was ranked as one of the top 30 best defensive tackles in the country, leading to offers from Clemson, Miami, Florida and Georgia, where he ultimately committed. Davis has received second team all-SEC honors once in 2020, and he was a preseason All-America pick this season. Davis is said to be a light hearted leader, excellent teammate and locker room lifting type of individual.

Ekwonu:

At Providence Day, Ekwonu continued the legacy of superb athletes in his family. Ekwonu’s father played collegiate basketball, and his mother was a high school track star. His twin brother Osita is a linebacker at Notre Dame, meaning the pressure was on Ikem to carry the torch as well. He delivered, earning first-team all-state honors for football, while also wrestling and anchoring his relay team. He was the #29 recruit in all of North Carolina and ranked in the top 35 offensive guards in the country. Ekwonu received interest from Harvard and Yale, but looking to make a name for himself and pursue the pros, Ekwonu opted to go to NC State. Ekwonu’s name stands for “my effort will not be in vain”.

Hutchinson:

Hutchinson is no stranger to doing whatever it takes to help the team. At Divine Child High School, Hutchinson played offensive line, long snapper, tight end and defensive end. He was named to the 2018 U.S. Army All-America game where he posted two sacks and caught the eyes of many. There was never a doubt though, as when the Wolverines expressed interest, the Michigan boy opted to stay in state. Hutchinson has been a member of the Wolverines for four years now, through ups and downs. Under the old defensive regime, Hutchinson was able to fight and earn enough reps to catch attention of many, but his role limited him. Heading into the offseason, with a new defensive coaching staff, Hutchinson promised to do whatever needed, and wanted to be the one guy they could always count on. Having a career year, Hutchinson has gone above and beyond what was expected.

4/10-The Performance:

Davis:

2020: 7 games, 16 tackles, 1 TFL and 1 sack.

2021: 7 games, 20 tackles, 3.5 TFLs and 2.0 sacks.

Ekwonu:

2019: 12 games, 50 pancakes and 7 sacks allowed.

2020: 12 games, 37 pancakes and 2 sacks allowed.

Hutchinson:

2019 (Missed time in 2020): 13 games, 69 tackles, 10.0 TFLs, 3.5 sacks and 3 forced fumbles.

2021: 8 games, 30 tackles, 7.5 TFLs, 6.0 sacks, 1 forced fumble and 1 fumble recovery.

5/10-The Good:

Davis:

Davis is not a flashy player who’s going to light up the box score. Davis opens things up for other players though, constantly. Davis is violent and aggressive, he uses his size and strength to move men and despite facing a bulk of double teams, his hand usage allows him to push off and stop the run consistently. His bull rush is strong, and his footwork is very good for a man of his size. Off the field, Davis is a humble leader who doesn’t need to make the big plays and get the attention constantly. He’s got a high football IQ and that will serve him exceptionally well at the next level.

Ekwonu:

When you watch Ekwonu the first thing that immediately jumps out is his aggressiveness. He’s violent, strong and packs a massive punch. When it comes to run blocking, he’s going to be able to stake a claim for the top run blocker in the class. He uses his power to clear holes quickly and can be the kind of guard you run behind early and often. Speaking of position, Ekwonu is likely better suited for the interior, but has played at tackle as well adding versatility as another layer to his game. Ekwonu has an incredibly high football IQ and his knowledge of how to take angles is exceptional. As TOJ’s resident offensive line expert Joe Belic noted, he varies pass sets within pass sets, and some of what you see him do can only compared to some of the top guys in the game.

Hutchinson:

This is a class with some superb defensive talent. Hutchinson has made a case to be near the top of that. From a physical standpoint, he has absurd length, his hips are fluid, his balance is exceptional and his athleticism is off the charts. Taking a closer look at his game, he provides the most diverse game of any edge rusher I’ve looked at to this point. Hutchinson is a great pass rusher, but he’s a top tier run stopper as well. Part of this is his experience in playing the less sexy roles in previous schemes, but he has so many facets to his game due to working in different outlets over his time at Michigan, that his game is very well rounded. His football IQ and versatility are both great, Hutchinson can line up almost everywhere and find ways to disrupt the play even if he’s mot the one making the play himself.

6/10-The Bad:

Davis:

Although not a liability against the run, Davis has yet to develop strong enough pass rushing skills to be a legitimate presence in the pass rush. This could limit him at the level. Along with that, Davis plays more comfortably at nose tackle which limits his value. He’s not as versatile as someone like Quinnen Williams, nor as quick. He’s not as quick off the ball and his closing speed is not great. Obviously, that comes with his size, but you hope for more agility.

Ekwonu:

The two biggest issues Ekwonu has pertain to his pass protection. Of the top three linemen, Linderbaum, Neal and then Ekwonu, he is the worst pass blocker. Although you could argue he has the highest pass blocking intelligence of the three, Ekwonu struggles to play up to that same level. His hand usage is lack luster and if he could improve his placement, that could do wonders. His biggest issue that I’ve been banging the drum about is his balance and tendency to lose control of it from lunging too far forward. Maintaining stability and controlling his center of gravity would be the best change he could make to take his pass blocking to the next level.

Hutchinson:

This will be one of the shorter “bad” sections I have done so far. Hutchinson has quelled a lot of the concerns many had coming into the season. Hutchinson has shown his play speed is top notch, and his motor is exceptional. The biggest thing I can pin point is that his pass rush moves could stand to advance, although that’s something that comes with time.

7/10-The Focus of Improvement:

Davis: Speed: How quickly he gets off the ball.

Ekwonu: Balance: If Ekwonu could avoid lunging too far, it could take his pass blocking a step further.

Hutchinson: Advancing his pass rush moves.

8/10-The Potential:

Davis:

Davis is the most fit reliant player of this bunch. He can be a day one starter that comes in and produces as a top run stuffer. The lack of variance in his skill set will hurt how much you keep him on the field, especially en lieu of better, more refined pass rushers. Davis will likely slot in as the nose tackle for a franchise relatively quickly. If he finds a fit where he can be given the chance to open up the game as he does and disrupt the game, Davis will thrive at the next level. I could see him developing into a top 15 nose tackle, with a floor as a starting nose tackle who rotates in pass rushing situations.

Ekwonu:

If you haven’t had a chance to listen to “Draft SZN” with James Kuntz, Michael Meegan, Joe Belic and myself, go check out this week’s episode where we conducted an offensive prospect roundtable. Joe and I disputed what Ekwonu brings to the table which led to his inclusion this week. As I look more into his game, the more I am reminded of certain parts of Rashawn Slater’s game more and more. He plays much more violent and he is a better run blocker than Slater was coming out of college. His knowledge is on par with Slater, but he fails to play as well rounded of a game as Slater.

Where I stand on Ekwonu is that if he can improve his pass blocking he could be a top tier lineman. I think his versatility isn’t as strong as what Slater brings to the table, but if you kept Ekwonu at guard you’d be perfectly fine. I see a route where Ekwonu could be a franchise guard, but he needs to develop certain aspects of his game, and if he does that, he can be firmly on that track. Even if he fails to develop to that point, Ekwonu still projects as a day-one starter.

Hutchinson:

Aidan Hutchinson can be a TJ Watt level disruptor at the next level. He’s begun to find comfort in his new scheme and his confidence is growing, evidently. His sack production has nearly doubled his collegiate high to this point. His versatility will add another layer to his game as well, as he’s going to bring more to the table than George Karlaftis and Adam Anderson. The potential is sky high with Hutchinson and as he continues to grow, his ceiling is through the roof.

9/10-The Outside Opinion:

Davis:

“But here’s the thing: this guy plays like Thanos vs. Thor, Captain America and Ironman in Avengers: Endgame. Throw your best at him, throw multiple people at him — it doesn’t matter. He’s bigger, he’s stronger, and he deserves to be one of the top players chosen in this class.”- Trevor Sikkema, PFF

Ekwonu:

“The 6-foot-4, 320 pound lineman surges in the run game, using his overwhelming power to move defenders off of their spots with ease. He also has a good anchor in pass protection and is very hard to get by in the passing game. He can also move in space well, which for his size is impressive. While he has to become a bit more consistent in a few areas, he has all of the tools to be extremely successful at the NFL level.”- Kevin Oestreicher, USA Today

Hutchinson:

He plays a powerful game and is truly relentless in pursuit. Hutchinson also has fast eyes and locates the ball really well. He has 6.0 sacks (tied for 14th in the country) and a forced fumble this season for the Wolverines.”- Todd McShay, ESPN

10/10-The Fit:

Davis:

Davis is the kind of silent difference maker the Jets could find a use for. However, the Jets defensive line not only has depth, but they have talent. Regardless of whether they resign Sheldon Rankins (which they should), they still have JFM and Quinnen Williams. The team has larger voids that need filling, and although Davis is an excellent player, their top picks should be allocated to larger holes.

Ekwonu:

The Jets spent two firsts in back to back years on upgrading the offensive line. They’ve taken steps forward, but there is still much more room to grow. Alijah Vera Tucker has come along quickly and proven to be well worth the selection. Mekhi Becton has been concerning due to his injuries, but when on the field he has shown franchise tackle potential. Adding Ekwonu and putting him at right guard would be a huge asset to the run game and aide Michael Carter in a big way. The Jets run to the left side of the field more than any team, and adding Ekwonu would give them a lead blocker to run behind consistently on the right side. All in all, I could get behind adding Ekwonu, but with the holes the Jets have, using a premier pick on another guard wouldn’t be the most desired.

Hutchinson:

The Jets will likely have a top pick and if so, Hutchinson is someone who could make a massive impact to this defense. The Jets have struggled to stop the run all season, and adding a guy like Hutchinson who can produce as a run stopper would be huge. As a pass rusher, Hutchinson is an animal who could wreck havoc alongside Carl Lawson. Hutchinson has so many layers to his game and his high football IQ makes him the kind of blue chip prospect that the Jets should be over the moon to have.

TOJ DraftSZN Presents Dylan’s Dimes: Week 6 Edition

Last week, I highlighted two guys on opposite sides of a Big Ten matchup and discussed Spencer Rattler. Despite the raw talent Rattler possesses, he proved some of his flaws that I pinpointed to be apparent when he lost control of the game and failed to work through his progressions, leading to his benching. This week, here’s to hoping the three players that go through the wringer don’t have similarly poor performances. 

Introduction:

Dylan’s Dimes will be a ten step breakdown of three of the biggest draft eligible players taking the field in some of the biggest matchups each week. I analyze background, on the field performance, off the field traits, opinions around the NCAA, all leading up to the dropping the dime on how they could fit with gang green.

1/10-The Prospects:

Every year, athletes that transcend their position come out of the draft. The Georgia Bulldogs are the top ranked team in the country, and a big part of their success is obviously tied to their talent. Coming off the edge, the Bulldogs have one of the most fluid pass rushers in EDGE, Adam Anderson.

The NBA Champions this year had their own Greek freak in Giannis Antetokounmpo. In Indiana, Purdue has their own version of the Greek freak. Despite a bumpy college career at times, the freak athlete and second edge going through the breakdown this week is EDGE, George Karlaftis. 

From high school, certain players emerge as stars. From high school star to college football national champion and being named an All-American, this player has had success at all levels. Despite LSU having a rough year and this player being out for the remainder of it, two years of Derek Stingley Jr.

2/10-The Measurables:

Anderson:

-Height: 6’5”

-Weight: 230 lbs

-Year: Senior

-Birthdate: 10/19/1999

-From: Rome, GA

Karlaftis:

-Height: 6’4”

-Weight: 275 lbs

-Year: Junior

-Birthdate: 4/3/2001

-From: Athens, Greece

Stingley Jr.:

-Height: 6’1”

-Weight: 190 lbs

-Year: Junior

-Birthdate: 6/20/2001

-From: Baton Rouge, LA

3/10-The Background:

Anderson:

Adam Anderson’s story is one of adversity and strength prevailing. After his sister and step father passed away at a young age, Anderson stepped up to help raise his family. Anderson produced on the gridiron to take care of them off it. Anderson was the 2016 state defensive plater of the year. He was highly touted and ranked as one of the top edge rushers in the country. He took off from there, committing to Georgia, then LSU, then back to Georgia. He bided his time behind Azeez Ojulari and other talented players, rotating in and making the most of each reps. 

Karlaftis:

Born in Greece, Yoros (renamed George) Karlaftis lived there until 2014 when unfortunately his father passed away, prompting a move to the United States. From there, Karlaftis found the game of football and excelled. He had 41 sacks in high school, was named to the U.S. Army All-American game in 2019 and was named defensive player of the year. In Track and Field, Karlaftis was a two-time state champion in shot put. Similarly to Anderson, Karlaftis dealt with the hand he was dealt and has excelled. 

Stingley Jr.:

Stingley Jr. has always had football in his blood. His grandfather played in the NFL and his father played in the AFL. He has been an absolute star from the start, putting up 27 interceptions in his time at The Dunham School. He was the Louisiana Gatorade Football player of the year and ranked as the top player in his class. He then committed to LSU where he started as a freshman, earned all-American accolades and had 6 INTs right out of the gate.

4/10-The Performance:

Anderson:

2020: 9 games, 13 tackles, 5.5 TFLs, 5.5 Sacks, 1 FF & 1 FR.

2021: 5 games, 19 tackles, 4.5 TFLs, 4.5 Sacks 

Karlaftis:

2019: 12 games, 54 tackles, 17.0 TFLs, 7.5 Sacks, 1 FF & 2 FR.

2020 (Injured for Majority of Season): 2 games, 4 tackles, 2.0 TFLs & 2.0 Sacks.

2021: 5 games, 20 tackles, 3.0 TFLs, 1.5 Sacks & 2 FF.

Stingley Jr.:

2019: 15 games, 38 tackles, 1.0 TFL, 6 INTs, 15 PBUs & 1 FR.

2020: 7 games, 27 tackles, 2.5 TFL, 5 PBUs, 1 FF & 1 FR.

2021 (Will Miss Remainder of Season): 3 games, 8 tackles, 3.5 TFLs & 1 FF.

5/10-The Good:

Anderson:

Adam Anderson is an incredibly fluid and effective pass rusher. He uses his size well and his light frame to burst into the gaps and make plays. Speaking of making plays, despite rotating into action behind top tier guys as I mentioned before, he still produced 5.5 sacks in his Junior year. He constantly demonstrates a high motor as he flies all over the field making plays even when it may seem out of reach. He chased down guys like Desmond Ridder who has exceptional mobility. Anderson’s athleticism and burst are constantly prevalent and will make him a force at the next level.

Karlaftis:

Karlaftis a well rounded prospect with a top tier football IQ. He moves men around systematically to not just make plays but open up the field for his teammates to make plays. He doesn’t always need the headlines, he is okay opening things up. Karlaftis, similarly to Anderson can also move all over the field. What’s unique with him is despite his frame, he moves all over the field like a safety. He’s a constant play maker, for example in 2019, he had a forced fumble, recovered two and snatched an interception against TCU. He is constantly involved in the plays and always tries to make an impact. 

Stingley Jr.:

In high school, as I mentioned earlier Stingley had 27 picks, and in college that transition has been seamless. He’s a ballhawking corner that if the ball is in play, will most likely come down with it. He’s physical but he has superb control and technique to channel it and time routes nearly perfectly. He’s faced the best of the best and done a very good job, going against tight ends like Kyle Pitts and Heisman winners like Devonta Smith, frequently. He’s not going to win every matchup, but he may be the most proven commodity given how he’s faired against top receivers.

6/10-The Bad:

Anderson:

For Anderson, his biggest issue that I can point stems from lack of closing ability. More often than not, he finds his way in the backfield. Although he can tackle in open space and take care of guys with good mobility, when he has an opportunity for a sack he struggles to close and typically walks away with more pressures. This season he has closed more efficiently, but time will tell if he can continue to do this, especially at the next level.

Karlaftis: 

For Karlaftis, he’s rebounded from his injury well, but he’s lacked the same productivity he had in his freshman year. He looks to be focusing more on disruption than closing and producing as many substantial big plays. He lacks a pop in his tackling and tends to shy away from laying bigger hits on players. He certainly has the power, but he needs refinement in order to develop that power into a bigger asset.

Stingley Jr.:

When it comes to pushing off his man and getting involved in the run game, Stingley tends to struggle. He tends to hang with his man so long that it’s hard for him to catch backup as a tackler. His range for tackling could stand to improve and in zone he could struggle at times if he fails to advance that.

7/10-The Focus of Improvement:

Anderson: Closing Ability

Karlaftis: Power

Stingley Jr.: Run Support

8/10-The Potential:

Anderson:

Adam Anderson reminds me of two guys from last year’s class, Odafe Oweh and former teammate Azeez Ojulari. His fluidity allows him to constantly make plays and his high motor will serve him well at the next level, similarly to as it has for Oweh. Anderson can start as a rotational pass rusher, but could easily develop into an every down weapon at the next level. Anderson has potential to be an impact player and he’s demonstrated that at every step of the way.

Karlaftis:

Karlaftis has been a leader for his teams, he’s a superb talent and can make plays for himself and others. He’s an ideal edge rusher for a lot of teams and can be an immediate impact guy like Maxx Crosby was for the Las Vegas Raiders in year one. He needs to land in the right scheme that caters to his skill set and allows him to demonstrate more productivity, but regardless, I foresee him becoming an impact player relatively fast.

Stingley Jr.:

There are no sure things in football, or sports for that matter. If I’m a betting man though, I foresee Stingley being a top tier number one corner at the next level. He’s hung with guys who have transitioned to the NFL and become top play makers, proving he can hang with the talent he will line up against. Stingley can be a top corner in this league and I foresee him bouncing back from his foot injury, having a decent combine performance and finding himself as a top pick in this year’s draft.

9/10-The Outside Opinion:

Anderson:

“He’s still college football’s most potent pass rusher.”- Mike Renner, Pro Football Focus

Karlaftis:

“So far this season, Karlaftis has been one of the best players in college football and has shown any doubter that he is a blue-chip talent and on the same level as Thibodeaux, if not better.”- Jack Borowsky, Sports Illustrated

Stingley Jr.:

“Stingley remains a force in the secondary. No opposing team wants to throw the ball in his direction and risk a potential interception. His speed and vertical jump make him the standout cornerback of this draft class.”- Lukas Weese, The Undefeated

10/10-The Fit:

Anderson:

Anderson could find himself thriving in the Saleh/Ulbrich defense. Anderson is fluid and can adapt quickly given different blocking schemes. He’s smart and will pick up the system quickly, and make an impact. The team could pair Anderson with Lawson off the edge and have a formidable pass rush duo moving forward, with two guys who can make plays and demonstrated superb athleticism on the regular.

Karlaftis:

Karlaftis fit isn’t as seamless as Anderson, but the Jets can’t pass up talent. Karlaftis is a talent on an off the field, he has a high football IQ and he’s a coaches dream. If the Jets can get Karlaftis, you do it and figure out fit after. With a talent like him, the team could bolster the defense immediately and that’s hard to pass up.

Stingley Jr.:

Aside from Linderbaum, Stingley is the only other player I have watched to this point that I will bang the drum for aggressively. Stingley is a top tier corner and would give the defense a bonafide star at corner for the first time since the Revis Island days. I would feel comfortable saying he has the highest floor in the class and is a very safe bet for success. Given the emergence of Bryce Hall, pairing the two together could insure the Jets secondary is set up for the foreseeable and long term future. 

TOJ Pod ft NFL Analyst Lindsey Ok

Will Parkinson interviews Lindsey OK on this episode of the TOJ Pod.

On this episode of the Turn on the Jets podcast, Will Parkinson is joined by NFL analyst Lindsey Ok as they discuss:

-The Zach Wilson Culture Fit
-Where the Jets have improved
-Expectations for 2021
-NFL Around the League Quick Hits

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The 2021 NFL Draft – We Made It

Joe and Connor with their final thoughts headed into the 2021 NFL Draft…

Joe Caporoso and Connor Rogers give their final thoughts headed into the 2021 NFL Draft, discuss their favorite prop bets, worst/best case scenarios for Thursday Night, if New England is trading up for a quarterback, Zach Wilson hype (and non hype) along with much more… 

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Author: Joe Caporoso

Joe Caporoso is the Owner and EIC of Turn On The Jets. His writing has been featured in the New York Times, Huffington Post, MMQB and AdWeek. Caporoso played football his entire life, including four years at Muhlenberg as a wide receiver, where he was arguably the slowest receiver to ever start in school history. He is the EVP of Content at Whistle Sports

Badlands – The 2021 New York Jets NFL Draft Guide

New Badlands – The 2021 New York Jets NFL Draft Guide is live!

Joe Caporoso, Connor Rogers and Greg Armstrong  go through all of your NFL Draft questions and the process of making our first annual Draft Guide. Among the topics covered are:

  • The Jets scouting department’s process
  • Whether the Jets should draft a RB or not 
  • Will a worthy OL be there at #23? 
  • Dream scenarios and final predictions for pick #23 and #34 
  • Potential trade partners 

SIGN UP ON PATREON TO SEE THE FULL GUIDE! 

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Author: Joe Caporoso

Joe Caporoso is the Owner and EIC of Turn On The Jets. His writing has been featured in the New York Times, Huffington Post, MMQB and AdWeek. Caporoso played football his entire life, including four years at Muhlenberg as a wide receiver, where he was arguably the slowest receiver to ever start in school history. He is the EVP of Content at Whistle Sports