No Huddle – New York Jets Green and White Drama Edition

TJ Rosenthal goes No Huddle on Geno Smith, reaction to the Green and White scrimmage and more…

TJ Rosenthal kicks off another week of New York Jets coverage at Turn On The Jets with his weekly No Huddle – Make sure to give TJ a follow on Twitter and Turn On The Jets a follow on Facebook.

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No Huddle – New York Jets Bye Week Edition

TJ Rosenthal goes No Huddle on the New York Jets after their bye week

TJ Rosenthal kicks off another week of New York Jets coverage at Turn On The Jets with his weekly No Huddle – Make sure to give TJ a follow on Twitter on Turn On The Jets a follow on Facebook.

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New York Jets – A Rebuilding Discussion

Joe Caporoso and TJ Rosenthal have a discussion about the New York Jets rebuilding

The word “rebuilding” is generally the last thing most fan-bases want to hear associated with their team in the off-season. Yet, the reality of a New York Jets rebuild is already upon us. Joe Caporoso and TJ Rosenthal had a brief discussion on this topic related to the 2013 Jets, here is what they had to say Continue reading “New York Jets – A Rebuilding Discussion”

Turn On The Jets Off-Season Roundtable – Secondary

The Turn On The Jets staff debates how the New York Jets should handle their secondary this off-season

Welcome to our off-season review of the New York Jets roster at Turn On The Jets. Each week we are going to attack a different position. We will have a roundtable discussion on it, Steve Bateman will submit a film breakdown examining it and our draft staff will look at potential prospects the Jets could add. So far we have covered quarterbackrunning backwide receiveroffensive linedefensive linelinebacker, this week we move to the secondary.

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No Huddle – The Ongoing Jets Disaster Edition

TJ Rosenthal goes No Huddle on the ongoing Jets disaster

We can’t remember being more embarrassed and humiliated as Jet fans. Even the Rich Kotite era was such a shock to the system that wondering “how much worse can it get this Sunday?” became a sick and twisted weekly habit. Last night’s tar and feathering was different. It fully exposed the sham that is the 2012 New York Jets. Exposed the personnel choices, the quarterback’s heart, the coaching staff’s ability to coach, the owners clear lack of attention in what was an “election year.” If you’re a Jet fan, it cant possibly get much worse than this. Can it?

1 – Ed Left, Tebow’s Ribs And Brandon Moore’s Ass

In the same game, Fireman Ed left the stadium early, the backup QB suited up with broken ribs and no third option behind him, and the starting QB ran his own broken play into the nationwide long derrière of his trusted veteran guard. A play that resulted in a fumble for a TD. In this same game, the opponent scored three TDs in :52 seconds to blow a 7-0 game wide open. A must win game no less.

The Jets number one superfan could t even watch. Too bad the rest of the entire country was forced to. In primetime. Thanks for the three hour special holiday comedy guys. With so many struggling out there, you gave a nation something to laugh at for an evening.

2 – Nobody Is Safe

Woody Johnson may have entered last night’s game with a “safe” list of coaches and players who were poised to be left unharmed by the results of this season. That list is now a crumpled up piece of paper in some garbage can.

Rex Ryan channeled his own inner Kotite after the game at a post game presser by saying “the offense did some good things.” Knock it off Rex. The organization is the joke of the sports world in America today. Then Ryan came out in support of Sanchez again. After an interception that ruined a quarter of collective team management, then “Butt Gate” Ryan should have been in support of nobody.

The more he hitches his wagon to the worst starting QB in the NFL the more he puts his own job in jeopardy now.

Nobody is safe anymore. Not Rex. Not anyone.

3 – The Roadmap Going Forward

The Jets roadmap going forward depends on what Johnson does regarding GM Mike Tannenbaum and Ryan. Sanchez has probably played himself out of a starting job in the league, thanks to his endless red zone mistakes, tunnel vision, and inability to energize others. The Jets right now are a mess on the field and off of it. Diehards will have to endure more bumps and bruises over the next five weeks before any attempts at turning the page begin. Expect more unnamed sources to accompany those bumps too.
The plane has now lost both wings and the cockpit is a giant smoke cloud.

What a disaster.

No Huddle – New York Jets Ugly Loss Edition

TJ Rosenthal goes No Huddle on the New York Jets 27-10 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers

Sure. Okay. We’ll admit it. This loss hurt. The ghosts of the AFC championship defeat were there for us and we will assume many other diehards as we watched. Many of us would have loved nothing more than having Mike Tomlin exit at 0-2.

A little payback.

That said, the Jets are 1-1, in a four way tie for first in the AFC East, and nowhere near any panic buttons that many thought they’d be pressing before heading down to Miami.

Here’s a quick look back on yesterday. A day we are disappointed about, but won’t be dwelling on for much longer.

1 – Why Can’t The Jets Tackle Ben?

Hey, Ben Rothliesberger is tough to bring down. Period. That’s why. Everyone knows that. Sunday, the Jets defense being unable to get to Ben when they had open lanes on blitzes, led to big results for Pittsburgh downfield. Being able to bring Big Ben down might have gotten the D off the field and kept the game within a score. That didn’t happen. Making it an uphill battle for the entire second half. To us this was the key issue all day.

2 -The Backbreaking Wallace TD.

The Jets were down 13-10 at halftime, and trying to tread water early in the third quarter, long enough in order to get back on track offensively. Then Mike Wallace grabbed what could have been a jump ball in the end zone. One that Antonio Cromartie foolishly overran. Even so, Wallace must have been in bounds by a blade of grass. A booth review that viewers never got a good look at to boot.

That odd play left the Jets no room for error at 20-10. Soon enough, the Steelers power running game began to roll downhill. This moment, this 50/50 ball, even with the Jets struggles on third down, and problems tackling later in the second half, is what really gave Pittsburgh control of the game.

3 – Landry’s Penalties Hurt, But We Like His Style And Aggression.

S Laron Landry had a late hit and a horse collar. Penalties that led to scores. On the flip side, the Jets new hard hitting safety is also establishing his turf and in the long run, this will bode well for the defense. The penalties hurt but we can live with them, knowing that Landry will do alot more good than bad this year. His style was sorely needed.

4 – Why Did The Jets Offense Come To A Halt? Greene Got Woozy and The Receivers Missed Their Few Shots

Shonn Greene was running with a great first step early on, and the Jets offense seemed like it was again ready to have a good day, until his head injury slowed him and the unit down. This changed the balance and overall rythym of the offense.

The young receivers failed to establish their size, and speed in space on a potentially big plays too. You hit on them you score fast. Not today. Rookie Stephen Hill got outmuscled downfield deep in a one on one matchup in the first half. Jeremy Kerley was over the middle and had a shot at a big play but seemed to cut his route short on a throw that Sanchez let loose deeper, thinking Kerley was going to head down the seem.

TE Jeff Cumberland misread a hot route that could have been a red zone first down, that instead led to just a FG.

There were also some drops.

Dustin Keller being out certainly didn’t help. With the choice to go with youth at WR though, even with Keller, these days will happen for Sanjay Lal’s corps in 2012. Hopefully less often than the ones that gave us the makings of that opening day explosion last week against the Bills.

5 – Hate To Say It, But Turn The Page On This One

The Jets are in a way four way tie in the AFC East with stars Darrelle Revis and Dustin Keller on the mend. Facing a rookie QB next week.

Things could be alot worse.

The Steelers game felt like it slipped and slithered away no doubt, but so many had the Jets 0-2 and desperately two games back by now. Instead they are still in position to accomplish their goals. Bite your tongues folks. Grin and bear it. Move on and get ready for a huge game in Miami, knowing that San Fran and Houston are waiting.

Does Sunday at Heinz leave a bad taste in the mouth? Sure. Is the “L” devastating? No. In fact it’s already time to move on and get ready for the Fish.

New York Jets Offense – How To Use Their Weapons

Joe Caporoso and TJ Rosenthal on how the New York Jets can get the most out of Santonio Holmes, Stephen Hill, Jeremy Kerley and Joe McKnight

Yesterday TJ Rosenthal wrote an article here looking at how the New York Jets can utilize the speed in their offense, namely Santonio Holmes, Stephen Hill, Jeremy Kerley and Joe McKnight. Today TJ and myself take a closer look at what each player brings to the table –

Santonio Holmes

Joe Caporoso – Holmes is an elite route runner and is explosive after the catch. He works best in the intermediate passing game, where he can catch the ball with a little space to improvise after catching the ball. Can we see this guy run another route besides a slant?

TJ Rosenthal – Get Tone the ball. Let 10 set the tempo in the passing game. In fact, the Jets should be including Holmes in the discussion as far as what he feels can work given the QB he has and the protection issues that have taken place. He doesn’t need a “C” on his chest to feel as though he is being asked to provide leadership. Make him part of the process of devising ways to get him the ball. This will also put the onus on him to make sure he is calling for plays that are possible at this given time. We already know how clutch he can be already.

Stephen Hill

Joe Caporoso – Hill has elite top end speed and size at the wide receiver position. He is built to run deep posts and go routes, just like he did his entire career at Georgia Tech. With his frame he should also be effective on slant routes. A nice part of Hill’s game is a willingness to block down the field, which could help spring big plays in both the run game and short passing game. He is going to have occasional mental lapses as a rookie receiver and has struggled with drops in August. Look for Hill to fluctuate between big plays and errors all season. 

TJ Rosenthal – We heard so much about Stephen Hill’s blocking prowess yet all we’ve seen so far have been half hearted attempts to get his feet wet as a pass catcher. Let a guy play to his strengths, and feel good about himself. This will help relax him. In a four wide speed package, Hill can be a deep down the sideline guy but use him more so, as  the one who can crack OLB’s as Joe McKnight and Jeremy Kerley come across with the catch. Allow Hill to gain confidence as a deadly blocker who springs the little guys down the sidelines. Let him use his height and speed yet think less with some go routes in this formation as well. Hill can also be the short slant guy the way Braylon Edwards, and his 6’4 frame was in 2010.

Jeremy Kerley

Joe Caporoso – Kerley is more quick than fast and is built like a prototypical slot receiver. He is going to run a ton of option routes and quick outs, making him a primary target on most 3rd and short situations. However, if he can get matched up on a linebacker or safety, he should be able to get down the seam and make plays.

TJ Rosenthal – He needs to be an underneath route guy who can make big plays with his feet in space. He’s not a household name yet, but a few short receptions that turn into 25 yard gains will help the offense create a threat that can open up room for guys like Dustin Keller. Like McKnight, Kerley can be a slot screen option. Especially on the side of Hill should he line up that way.

Joe McKnight

Joe Caporoso – McKnight is a running back who can run routes and catch the football like a receiver. He also has durability issues and is prone to mental mistakes. The Jets can get the most out of him by working him on screen passes and then lining him up in the slot and hoping to get him matched up on linebackers. Tony Sparano needs to find a way to get him the ball in space consistently

TJ Rosenthal – Part of the reason in making 25 a slot guy is his inability to pass protect. A problem that has given Bilal Powell time on third down. This is a bigger problem for the Jets offense. One that needs explosive laymakers on the field as often as possible. Stop thinking about McKnight as solely a RB and use him on flares, screens and short underneath routes. Having him out there even as a decoy can serve the same purpose of opening up room for Keller as any success by Kerley would provide. Lining up Keller and McKnight to one side could create favorable one on one’s near the line of scrimmage.

No Huddle – Curtis Martin, Antonio Cromartie and Tim Tebow

TJ Rosenthal goes No Huddle looking at Curtis Martin HOF speech, Antonio Cromartie and Tim Tebow

TJ Rosenthal is back with his weekly No Huddle, talking on a number of different issues surrounding the New York Jets as they prepare for their first pre-season game. Make sure to follow on TJ on Twitter –

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As we head into week one of the preseason schedule we take a look back on the past seven days in Jets nation. Never a dull moment around here –

Curtis Martin: 

What a Hollywood movie Curtis Martin’s life has been. From his tragic youth to redemption through the love for his mom and family, football and the coaches who become role models.

After making us all cry in the early part of his story, Curtis offered that even though he never grew up a football fan, the sport taught him about life. His speech taught us a few things too about perseverance, and the value of what’s truly important in this world.

Few Hall Of Fame acceptance speeches have been better.

A Week in The Life Of Antonio Cromartie:

Cro is a character. He’s up, he’s down, he’s athletic, he’s a game changer yet wears a bullseye on his back when he struggles. He’s quotable and he’s always honest.

That said, calling himself the second best WR on the Jets, even if it was taken out of context of it being a smack talk joke, was not what the Jets needed most regarding the passing game. What they needed and still need more, is for a true WR2 to emerge. And fast.

Later last week, Cro then of course goes ahead and almost breaks WR1’s rib during a Saturday night scrimmage. Figures. Only the Jets, right?. Luckily Mr. Holmes is OK.

Now Cro, make the same noise you made last week on the field and off, at your actual position. Be consistent. Lock down WR2. Jump some routes. Be that playmaker week in week out, that we envisioned you would be when you arrived.

As for wideout, if you streak downfield every so often on offense, we won’t complain either.

The Holmes scare:

Taking the Cromartie hit on Santonio during Saturdays intrasquad scrimmage a step further, sometimes a little doomsday fear is a good thing. Do the Jets REALLY feel safe if Tone were to go down? The answer is, depending on how they reacted for those few hours whoever awaiting X-Rays. Depth with experience still an issue.. Relying on potential for a win now team is a dangerous proposition.

Our suggestion? Pick up a vet who has made a few plays in this league before week one. This player can always be cut as time goes on. Be smart, not stubborn. Kids are kids. Give them time to develop and when the time is right, then allow them centerstage. Don’t just hand a young player a big job because there is no other choice.

Obama Chimes In On Jets QB situation:

First off, we truly believe Rex when he says as he did last week that Mark Sanchez is the clear cut QB and Tim Tebow is a special weapon who poses unique problems for opponents. We disagree with the Prez that fans should fear a controversy. We also wonder, ‘Mr President shouldn’t you be focused more on that 1970’s game show host that you will be facing in November?’

Then again, the NFL is alot more fun to banter about than any wonk talk about the economy is. Another diversion from the real issues, by some Commander in Chief.

We get it.

Boomer Esiason Says Jets Should Cut Tebow:

The former Jet QB now turned WFAN radio host offered this opinion this morning, mostly due to how Tebow throws the ball. Enough already with this people.

Tim Tebow is a runner who CAN throw at times, got it? The Jets do. As his role develops into something of a hybrid playmaker based on the potential to line up in many places, maybe everyone will finally believe Gang Green when they say they have a clear cut starter in Sanchez.

Now in defense of Boomer, the Jets will have to slide somebody up to the QB2 role at some point. No backup should be taking and delivering the hits that Tebow will this season. If the McElroy-Simms battle for the QB3 spot doesn’t develop one of those players into a viable 2 right now, the Jets might want to hit the market for a veteran.

Even if the move becomes a trick play on Tebow, who thought he was signing on here to be the backup. Hey, whatever is best for the team isn’t that true 15? You’ve said it yourself, that this is your goal in New York.

On more than one occasion.

Well what’s best may soon mean a slight change in plans. Tanny, Move Tebow to QB3 in time. This way, there will be a viable option if 6 goes down for a period of time. It’s still a passers league right now. The Jets have to prepare for the worst and be able to take part in an aerial show to some degree, if the worst does happen.

New York Jets Adjusting To Open Door Policy

TJ Rosenthal wonders if the New York Jets can handle an open door media policy?

TJ Rosenthal of The Jet Report is back with another feature, today looking at the New York Jets ongoing struggles with media exposure. Make sure to give TJ a follow on Twitter and to follow his work all season long at both The Jet Report and here at Turn On The Jets 

For the Jets, the offense with their return to the Ground and Pound, and the defense with their newcomers and hopeful additions of the 4-3 and the 46, are just the major concepts going under a transformation on the fly. There is more.  You have key players most notably Mark Sanchez who seek consistency and efficiency. Then there are the coaches starting with Rex Ryan who aim to have a better handle on guiding things than they did during the 8-8 disaster last year. Finally, you have the tricky open door media policy. One that provides a unique window into the minds of the personalities of this team directly, but when utilized foolishly, still threatens to divide before it conquers.

On Monday Antonio Cromartie told the world that he is currently the second best wideout the Jets have. It sounded like a joke, or a street ball challenge to us. It came off as a slight though to newly acquired Chaz Schilens. The episode made national headlines thanks to the fact that ESPN has replaced the idea of an HBO “Hard Knocks” return this summer by pitching it’s own tents in Cortland to stalk the Jets every morning. The episode forced Rex Ryan to remind his club and in a way himself, to be careful about HOW one addresses the media.

After all, it had only been days since Santonio Holmes, a star who constantly struggles with timing and tone (no pun intended) when it comes to airing out his thoughts near a microphone, stated publicly that a two QB system won’t work.

In Ryan’s mind, who knew what player would simply step up to the podium and do some damage next. Who could tell how the next words out of a Jet players mouth would be interpreted by fans, teammates, and sportswriters?

To Ryan, Monday early evening meant warning time.

Hey, Rex’s Jets will never end up quiet. Silent. Shy. It’s not in their DNA. They can however, like both sides of the ball, find a groove that works for them. That embodies who they are in an effective, rather than destructive way. Post practice articles that popped up and questioned whether or not this was the first new Gang Green locker room squabble, after a plethora of them took place last year, were jumping the gun. In the same way that QB pitch counts between Sanchez and Tim Tebow are jumping the gun right now. However, Ryan’s warning shot was on point in that it’s never too early to establish habits worth keeping throughout an entire season.

The Jets have to realize from the top of the organization on down that the media  will continue to look for anything that keeps the newsworthy club relevant in banner headline fashion. The Jets are one of those “it” teams, especially now that some guy named Tebow has joined them. How they finished last season only dramatizes further the storyline of the rise and fall of a cocky, confident, brash club. The real question now is where does the story end. Will the Jets rise again under Ryan or sink further into confusion and disarray that to some, only scratched the surface in 2011?

At this point in time it is all a work in progress and too early to tell. Rebranding the offense to feature the ground game, while unleashing a new versatile athletic defense provides a new roadmap for Sanchez and Co. to follow, as they seek a way back to the playoffs. Heading back down the winning direction however, while avoiding the pitfalls of quotes that writers can turn into locker room wedges, may be the biggest challenge of them all for the 2012 Jets.

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New York Jets 2012: Interview With Rotoworld’s Evan Silva

TJ Rosenthal interviews Rotoworld’s Evan Silva, who gives his outlook for the 2012 New York Jets…and it isn’t pretty

TJ Rosenthal had the opportunity to sit down with Evan Silva from Rotoworld and Pro Football Talk to discuss the 2012 New York Jets and the reasons he believes the team will struggle so much. We never shy away from varying opinions and thank Evan for taking the time to so thoroughly explain his opinions…even if we do disagree with them. Take it away TJ…

Rotoworld Senior NFL Editor Evan Silva is one of the up and coming NFL analysts out there today. Silva, who also contributes to NBC Sports and Profootballtalk.com, has recently caught the attention of some Jets fans who have come across some not so promising tweets from him when it comes to the Jets outlook for 2012. The Jet Report caught up with him to discuss in further detail why he believes the Jets will struggle this season.

How will the Jets fare in 2012?

I don’t think they’ll be very good. The one factor that may prevent the Jets from finishing as one of the league’s worst teams in terms of won-loss record is an easy schedule. They have the AFC South and NFC West as non-division opponents. They should also be better than the Dolphins. But I think the Jets will start the season 1-4 and end up losing along the way a number of games most people believe they “should” win because they will struggle mightily to generate offense.

Mark Sanchez?

I usually try to avoid bandwagoning the mainstream, common refrains. And I realize it’s become mainstream to criticize Mark Sanchez. At the same time, I’ve seen enough of Sanchez to believe — know might even be a better word — that he’s not the answer at quarterback for the Jets. He’s a timid passer, scared to challenge deep, doesn’t trust his arm, and plays frenetically in the pocket. The Jets’ bye falls in Week 9 this year. Regardless of the phony offseason contract extension, I think Sanchez will lose his starting job before or during the off week.

I think if Sanchez is ever going to successfully engineer an offense — and not be a quarterback at the controls of a team trying to stay competitive despite him — it will happen down the road, outside of New York. I actually think that is going to happen. Sanchez will have some strong years later in his career, long after the Jets move on.

Is the AFC East “Patriot owned” with the closest challenger to the throne gearing up in Orchard Park not Florham Park, as many believe?

I like what the Bills did in the spring. They desperately needed to improve their pass rush, and they will be a more dangerous team defensively this year than they have been in quite some time. But I don’t think they’ll be more than a 7-9 win team. And I think the Jets are looking at about seven victories in an absolute best-case scenario. So, yes, I think the AFC East is Patriot owned.

The Ground and Pound: Talk about it as a viable or non viable concept at this point in time in the NFL.

It would be viable if the Jets had a premier NFL back and an offensive line capable of dominating in the trenches, snap to snap and game to game. The Jets do not have either of those elements. I have reviewed 2011 games, and I actually thought the Jets’ run blocking was better last year than it was given credit for. The front five opened lanes. There were plenty of cutback opportunities. The back consistently failed to capitalize. Shonn Greene is another major liability on this team, and I think you could make a good argument that he’s an even bigger liability than Sanchez.

Are the pieces in place for the Jets to at least achieve their goals with this system on offense?

I don’t think so. Not even close. I mean, what is the Jets’ strength on offense? It’s definitely not the passing game. And you can’t tell me it’s Shonn Greene. I enjoyed watching the Jets a couple of years ago when you had Braylon Edwards and Santonio Holmes threatening defenses vertically, and Dustin Keller and Jerricho Cotchery working the seam. The offensive line was maybe the best in the league. The Jets didn’t have elite backs, but there was a vertical threat and a punishing front-five group that worked in unison to kind of compensate for the talent shortcomings in the backfield. The Jets won 11 games that year. They could compete with anyone.

The Jets have gotten worse since then, probably much worse. The right tackle is a major, major problem. Wayne Hunter isn’t just a poor pass-protecting tackle. He gets knocked off the ball in the run game, too. And right tackle in a run-first scheme is a crucial puzzle piece. You want a guy there that you can run behind. Pound it off his backside. Hunter isn’t remotely close to that guy.

How about adding Cedric Benson?

I don’t think Benson would be a terrible pickup. He can handle a large workload and fits the scheme from the standpoint that he’s a power runner. He does a better job of picking up blocked yards than Greene. He sees the field better than Greene. But Benson doesn’t have any big-play ability. He doesn’t play in the passing game. When Benson is in the game, the defense knows the run is coming, which makes the offense easy to defend. He would not solve the Jets’ problems.

Tim Tebow?

I like Tim Tebow. I think he fits the Jets philosophically because he is a run-first quarterback. Rex Ryan and Tony Sparano want to pound the rock. I think that by midseason, Tebow will have overtaken Sanchez because he’s a superior philosophical fit. He’s also willing to stand in the pocket and test the defense downfield. Even if he’s not putting it on the money every time, I think that’s more than you can say about Sanchez. I think Tebow gives the Jets a better chance of delivering the rock to Santonio Holmes in the vertical passing game than Sanchez does.

The Jets are begging for a quarterback controversy, by acquiring Tim Tebow. And I think it will start off very rocky. But I think ultimately he will prove their best option to play under center.

How do you see him fitting into the equation offensively should he remain QB2?

It’s pretty clear that he will be used on special teams, and on offense have a designed package of plays for about 5-12 snaps per game. Offensively, I think it will be a disaster because you already have a starting quarterback whose down-to-down consistency is a major issue, and then you are pulling him off the field for a different quarterback who is sure to be a fan favorite. There is little doubt in my mind that it will cause problems for the Jets internally, until Tebow takes over full time.

Will Tebow improve at throwing the football as a pro?

I don’t feel great about betting against Tim Tebow long term, but I don’t think he will improve as a passer. He’s not a natural thrower of the football. Passing the ball into tight windows with precision and consistency is not in Tim Tebow’s DNA. Watch a bunch of Tebow’s throws uninterrupted, and you can see it in the way the football comes out of his hand. I don’t think we’ll see him get much better, but I also don’t think that necessarily means he can’t quarterback a winning offense.

How much of Mark Sanchez’s inability to elevate his play in 2011 when the Jets started the year attempting to open it up, had to do with Brian Schottenheimer’s playcalling, and or any handcuffs having been put on him since day one?

The issues are with Sanchez. They’re not with Schottenheimer. Schottenheimer ultimately did not successfully coordinate an explosive offense, and by failing to do so he failed to do his job. I know it’s easy to pile on the guy who’s gone. The guy who failed. But if he had an effective quarterback, Schottenheimer would still be the Jets’ offensive coordinator. In Sanchez, he did not have that.

The Jets did open last season with a passing offense. For instance, in the Week 1 Dallas game, the Jets used shotgun on 38 of their 64 offensive snaps. The Jets were using three receivers as their base offense early in the year. They opened up their offense and gave their quarterback a chance to really establish himself as a top-flight NFL passer. When Sanchez failed to produce the results the Jets wanted, Ryan called the thing off and went back to the Ground and Pound. We’d be telling a different story — and Schottenheimer would still be around — if Sanchez had played well in the passer-friendly offense. It all comes down to execution. Sanchez did not execute.

Can Tony Sparano make Sanchez into the leader the Jets first envisioned, when they traded up to select him 5th overall in 2009?

I obviously don’t think so. I don’t even think Sparano is trying to do that. The Jets hired Sparano to implement a running-based offense. In the NFL these days, you don’t implement a running-based offense when you have a quarterback who throws the football effectively. With Sparano calling the offense, the Jets will try to get back to winning games in spite of Sanchez. That’s not an endorsement of the quarterback, and that’s probably not going to work unless you have an elite running foundation. And the Jets do not have that. Sanchez will be asked to manage games, avoid turnovers. Hit the open man in obvious passing situations. He’ll be a complementary piece — a role player. In pro sports, it’s difficult to truly be a great “leader” when you’re a role player.

Does the offensive line have the potential talent wise to rival Rex Ryan’s initial unit that once housed names like Faneca and Woody?

No, they don’t. This is pretty obvious. I think the Jets can be a decent run-blocking team, but not to the point that they open enough holes to turn Shonn Greene into a great back. A healthy Nick Mangold for an entire season will help, but otherwise you have all of the same linemen returning from last year. You have the new offensive line coach talking up Hunter like he can play. To me, these are the signs of a delusional organization that is internally evaluating its own talent poorly.

The rookies: The Jets are real high on Quinton Coples, Stephen Hill and Demario Davis, among others they selected during April’s draft. Can any team realistically expect a serious contribution from so many first and second year players?

Absolutely they can. First- and second-year players contribute at high levels every year. The jury is out on all three of the players you mentioned for various reasons. For Coples, his motor is a concern. And he’s not a bend-the-edge pass rusher. I watched quite a bit of Hill at Georgia Tech, and at times he looked like the best player on the field. At others, he looked like the worst. I think the Jets will struggle to get him the ball, and we don’t know a whole lot about him because he ran one route in college. Davis is a small-school phenom who is probably a year away from impact.

On defense the Jets want to alternate between the 3-4, 4-3 and 46. Will this provide more versatility or lead to more confusion?

Rex Ryan knows a lot more about defensive schemes than me, and I don’t doubt for a second that the Jets will trot out an effective 2012 defense no matter what formation they’re using. The Jets will play good defense. I still question whether they have a pass rusher capable of instilling fear in offenses and altering field position. I would also think that in order for the 46 to be successful, you’d need a quality centerfield safety to roam the deep middle. I don’t think the Jets have that, and my guess is that it’s an area in which they’ll be exposable. But all in all, I have the utmost confidence in Ryan’s defensive strategy and think his unit will play well.

I just think the Jets will be heavily reliant on their defense to score points. Perhaps too reliant on the defense to take the football away and score touchdowns. Because I don’t think the offense is going to move the ball and put it in the end zone. They will need the defense to do it.

Are LaRron Landry and Yeremiah Bell an upgrade at safety over Jim Leonhard and Brodney Pool?

If LaRon Landry is healthy — and there is no way for any of us to tell whether he is — he is a ferocious in-the-box safety. He blows up ball carriers and can separate them from the football. He will be an upgrade if and only if he is healthy.

Yeremiah Bell is 34 years old and got destroyed in coverage by tight ends last season. I hope the Jets don’t plan on matching him up with Rob Gronkowski and Aaron Hernandez. I think Bell can bring to the table run-support skills and veteran “leadership,” but the former is a dime-a-dozen trait at this point and the latter is unquantifiable in terms of value, and I’d ultimately put zero stock in it.

The Jets sense a big year out of Mo Wilkerson? Do you?

Wilkerson was a really good pass rusher in the MAC and he earned extensive playing time as a rookie, and played pretty productively. I’m not going to pretend to have watched him closely, but I think there are certainly promising signs and I would bet on him becoming a pretty good player. But the Jets seem to “sense” a big year out of every player on their roster. Shonn Greene, Wayne Hunter, Mark Sanchez, LaRon Landry, Kyle Wilson. So I don’t think it matters much that they “sense” a big year out of Wilkerson because they do that for everybody.

The current air attack corps: Holmes, Hill, Schilens, Kerley, Keller, Cumberland with of course some blocking TE’s, late picks and UDFA’s mixed in…A sufficient enough group to keep eight out of the box all day?

I don’t think the idea of keeping eight defenders out of the box has much to do with the pass-catching assembly. I think it has everything to do with the quarterback. And until the Jets get quarterback play that worries opposing defensive coordinators, those D-Coordinators are going to keep eight in the box, attacking the line of scrimmage and daring the quarterback to beat them.

Why not re-sign Braylon Edwards?

I don’t know how much Edwards has left. He’s coming off a troubling, recurring knee injury and couldn’t keep a starting job in a poor 49ers receiver corps last year. I know the New York Post reported that the Jets have essentially ruled out bringing Edwards back. So probably a moot point.

Why hasn’t Dustin Keller turned into a top tier TE yet?

I think Keller has developed into a nice player. He’s a solid starter, certainly not one of the Jets’ weaknesses. I think he’s not considered an elite tight end because he doesn’t put up huge stats. Stats for a player like this can be a function of the offense in which he plays. The Jets don’t throw the ball a ton. I also think it’s no secret that he blocks poorly. Keller can stretch the seam and has improved as a hands catcher. But he’s not a great fit for a run-first offense because he can’t block.

Some have recently said regarding your twitter posts on certain Jets personnel that “Evan Silva just hates the Jets, that’s all.” How would you respond to those who justify your take on the team as being more personal than analytical?

I’d just say I have nothing personal against the Jets. I don’t think they’re going to be a good ball club in 2012, and that’s precisely why I said those things.

2012 NY Jets Biggest strength: Darrelle Revis
2012 NY Jets Biggest weakness: Offense

Word association: In a few words or less:

Rex Ryan: Great defensive mind.
Tony Sparano: Fine coach, but I don’t see how he’s an upgrade on Callahan.
Mike Tannenbaum: Fired after this season.
Mark Sanchez: Benched by midseason.
The Ground and Pound: There are certain elements you need to make it work. Jets lack them.
Tim Tebow: Fun guy to root for.
Quinton Coples: Versatile five-technique end. Will be a solid — not spectacular — NFLer.
Darrelle Revis: Best defensive player in football.
Buffalo Bills: Fitzpatrick will hold them back.
NE Patriots: Have revolutionized the NFL.
The AFC Playoff Picture: Like the Pats and Steelers. Titans are my sleeper.
The Jets Offense in 2012: Hard to watch.
The Jets Defense in 2012: Must carry the team.
Jets Chemistry Issues of 2011: Don’t care much about them.