New York Jets – Idzik Begins Process Of Building New Team

A round-up of how New York Jets General Manager John Idzik is moving forward with the rebuilding process

The NFL is in absolute frenzy right now with the official opening of free agency. The New York Jets have not been overly active, as we expected but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a large collection of news to round-up. Here is our opinions, commentary and predictions on what’s happening with the Jets as of right now, along with a few thoughts around the league

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New York Jets Defensive Film Breakdown: Week 10

A defensive film breakdown of the Jets vs. Seattle with a preview of how they match-up against St. Louis

With 10 weeks and 9 games already in the books for the 2012 New York Jets, the team’s record is extremely reflective of their overall team play. The Jets seem to only play well in stretches, on one side of the ball. This team has struggled mightily in two thirds of the game over the past few weeks. Luckily, we’re here to break down the sole third that has not been an entire disappointment for the better part of this season.

The Jets week 10 defensive effort was actually stellar for the most part of their matchup at Seattle. This unit was forced into some tough spots, field position wise, on multiple occasions throughout this game, and, for the most part, did a fantastic job of not giving up their ground in tough situations. Outside of about 2 possessions through the first three quarters, the defensive play of New York was lights out. Unfortunately, with virtually no support from the offense and special teams, this group was worn out by the fourth quarter, resulting in the inflated score that now shows on the stat sheet.

However, don’t be fooled by the numbers. Defensively, New York played much better than the box score shows. The front seven, particularly the defensive line, was the most impressive unit on the field, among other individuals as well. Rookie Quinton Coples and 2nd year Defensive End Muhammed Wilkerson have not put up monstrous stats thus far, but each of them continue to prove that their worth on this defense is virtually invaluable. Among the two young promising defensive ends, this group as a whole was quite impressive, outside of a few subpar performances and lapses in play.

For this week’s defensive film breakdown, we will highlight the group’s top individual performers, followed by our usual format of breaking down each group as a whole, with an emphasis on the defensive line. We’ll then take a look on what it all means for Sunday’s must-win game in St. Louis.  Lets jump right in.

Week 10 Top Defensive Performers:

Antonio Cromartie, CB: Cromartie continues to assert his dominance since the loss of Darrelle Revis in week 3 to a season ending ACL tear. Coverage wise, the contest in Seattle seemed effortless for Cromartie. When matched up with Golden Tate, the same player who took joy in facing Kyle Wilson, Cromartie was extremely physical and aggressive, not allowing Tate to get off the line easily. On film, Tate’s frustration when lined up across from Cromartie was obvious. While matched up with Sidney Rice, Cromartie was on him like…well, white on rice (see what I did there?). The sole play that Rice was able to get a step on Cromartie, Seattle’s attempted flea flicker, was a fantastic display of the type of athlete Cromartie really is. Trailing by nearly 5 yards, Cromartie demonstrated make up speed that can only be seen when watching a handful of NFL defensive backs. Still, Rice had a chance to make a tremendous catch, but all hope for that was lost thanks to a heads-up, last minute, punch at the ball from Cromartie. The Jets defacto defensive leader also displayed his high level of football intelligence (save the Children’s names jokes, we’re talking about football here), as well as a phenomenal feel for the defense, as he repeatedly sniffed out routes before the ball was even released by Seahawks’ QB Russell Wilson, as he abandonded his coverage to jump the route of the would be intended receiver on more than one occassion. It’s hard to think about where this defense would be this season if not for the efforts of Cromartie up until this point.

Quinton Coples, DE: Many casual observers of this team, and league in general, have been deeming Coples as a poor selection by the Jets in last year’s draft simply because he has yet to put up a massive stat line. This assertion could not be farther from the truth. Coples may not be jumping off of the stat sheet just yet, however his play on the interior of the defensive line has been fantastic thus far, and continues to improve week to week. The strongest point in Coples game right now, outside of his pure athleticism, is his growing ability to utilize his length. Coples’ reach is that of defensive stalwart, and the extension he has been getting on opposing offensive lineman is becoming a serious problem for the rookie’s opponents in every game. Also playing with great leverage, Coples’ effective use of his long arms allows him to get excellent separation against the run and pass, giving him the ability to dictate what he wants to do more often than not. The sacks and double-digit tackle games are sure to come down the road, but for now Coples is getting better on the little things — footwork, hand technique, leverage, separation, block recognition, etc.– with every rep he takes. Jets fans should be ecstatic over this selection, as a year or two from now Coples could very well be considered among the NFL’s top defensive lineman, if the trend of improvement continues.

Muhammed Wilkerson, DE: Like Coples, Wilkerson has had his doubters this year, simply because he isn’t putting up monster numbers. However, consider this: Wilkerson is, by far, the best player in the entire Jets front seven this year. Think about what that means for a second. Wilkerson is the best performer in a front 7 that has struggled greatly this season. Do you think that maybe, just maybe, opposing offenses recognize this and circle number 96 on their gameplans every single week. Considering the attention he has drawn, as displayed by the vast amount of double teams he faces on a weekly basis, along with the fact that teams are seemingly sliding their protection toward him on passing downs, it suddenly isn’t very difficult to undertand why Wilkerson isn’t putting up the huge numbers that many were projecting heading into 2012. When taking all of this into account, it is truly impressive that he has still been as productive as he has been. In a recent ranking of the top defensive ends in the NFL, Pro Football Focus put Wilkerson second to only JJ Watt, based on their grading criteria which takes all aspects of defensive line play into account. Wilkerson is the foundation of this front seven, and proved why yet again last Sunday in Seattle, where he proved to be adapting to all of the attention he is getting by effectively separating double teams, recognizing shifts in protection toward him, and playing with an overall confidence that is displayed by only a few on this entire roster. Pair Wilkerson and Coples with a healthy Nose Tackle and an effective pass rushing Outside Linebacker, and all of a sudden people are talking about this Jets defense as having one of the most effective front sevens in all of football.

Mike DeVito, DT: I haven’t been able to say enough about what DeVito brings to this team in terms of motor, energy, and leadership all season long, a trend that continued in Seattle. While DeVito certainly isn’t the flashiest guy you’ll see, he is the prototype for what a blue collared player really is. With a relentless motor, and strong grasp of assignment, DeVito continues to lead through example. We could easily break down the plays in Seattle where he mugged opposing offensive lineman, resulting in a tackle for loss, or for short gain, plus his strip sack, but even that wouldn’t justify DeVito’s overall body of work. He continues to be plugged in all over the line, at the 1, 3, and 5 technique spots, and rarely ever lets down. The 1 technique is probably his weakest position, due to the fact that he does not possess the elite strength and size to consistently battle double teams, however his versatility as an interior lineman, although often overlooked, should not be something viewed as expendable. An impending free agent, DeVito should be offered a new contract by New York following the season. His numbers will likely not break the bank, and one would think he would be fine with a cap friendly deal, so there should be no reason for him to be playing elsewhere next year. That is, of course, unless Mike Tannenbaum continues his trend of letting blue collared veterans with great leadership ability walk out the door (See Jones, Thomas; Richardson, Tony; Faneca, Allen; Ellis, Shaun; Ihedigbo, James; Cotchery, Jerricho; Washington, Leon).

Bart Scott, ILB: You did not misread that. Although he hasn’t been the player he was in 2009 and 2010 for much of the past two season, Bart Scott actually played with a similar level of intensity and aggressiveness that made him such a force during the Jets’ back to back AFC Championship game seasons. Scott looked quicker and more aggressive than he has all year against Seattle, as he displayed the ability to fly downhill, take on lead blockers, and completely stuff any run headed his way. Hell, he even registered a rare sack for a veteran his age, nursing a toe injury, in the loss. Is the Madbacker of old completely back? I don’t think he will ever be. However, the flashes of his former self that were on display last Sunday are surely a sign of encouragement entering the final seven weeks.

Defensive Line:

Sione Pouha – Pouha has clearly not been himself this season, seemingly nursing a back injury that has prevented him from playing with the level of explosion and leverage Jets fans have become accustomed to. However, the Seattle game showed more glimpses of the old Sione than we have seen all season long. He was finally able to show some explosion and strength off of the ball, resulting in him occupying multiple blockers on numerous occasions. This team’s lack of ability to defend the run this season stems a vast amount from the lack of play at the NT position, with Pouha not playing at 100%, and Kenrick Ellis missing extensive time. However, Pouha’s play on Sunday was a major contribution to why the front seven players listed in our top defensive performers were able to excel. Pouha’s ability to clog the middle with multiple blockers sprung linebacker Bart Scott to be able to roam free, fly around, and make the plays he made, while also creating more one on one scenarios for Coples and DeVito. Wilkerson still drew a good amount of double teams, but if Pouha can continue to increase his play, it will likely begin to limit the attention that can be paid to big Mo. While he proved to still be virtually useless in rushing the passer, a healthy Pouha’s value against the run is indispensable.

Bryan Thomas – This was probably one of the best performances, if not the best performance, that Thomas has put on all season. While he still struggles in space, and rushing the passer on a grand scale, Thomas was able to effectively set the edge against the run, while actually proving to be a handful for Russell Okung. Thomas displayed solid leverage, and a good feel for the overall blocking scheme of Seattle, helping contribute to his team high 7 tackles, while adding half a sack as well. A good sign, but one that must keep Jets fans skeptical, based on his overall performance up until this point of the season. Cerebrally, Thomas is great. Physically, he is at the point in his career where it is difficult to put together performances similar to his against Seattle on a weekly basis.

Calvin Pace – Pace, like Thomas, put together a rather surprising performance to the outside observer. However, if you have been reading these breakdowns throughout the seaon, Pace’s performance was right on point with what we have been saying since week 1. Pace is very solid against the run, can set the edge well, has excellent technique, but just lacks that second gear at this point in his career. Well, last week’s game summed that up to perfection. Pace was his usual tenacious self inside the box, and proved once again, to have a variety of pass rush moves, effective to get beyond the opposing tackle, yet not quite enough to actually get to the quarterback in a timely manner. Mike DeVito’s sack strip was actually caused by a ferocious rush by Pace that forced Russell Wilson to become frazzled to the point where he carelessly stepped into Mike DeVito’s interior rush, without protecting the football, resulting in one of the best defensive plays of the day. Pace still struggles greatly in coverage, but at this point he and Thomas are still the best options as everydown OLBs on the roster, which tells you all you need to know about how poorly this team’s depth has been constructed.

Garrett McIntyre – McIntyre continued to show a high motor against Seattle, recording a couple tackles in situations where he came off the backside unblocked, but he is a perfect example of how poor the depth is at the position. I am unsure if I can think of another NFL team that he would be getting meaningful reps with.

Linebackers:

With the exception of Scott, the overall play of this unit was just slightly above average. David Harris looked better than he has in recent weeks, but he is far from being the dominant force on the inside that the Jets were hoping he’d become. He did a much better job of taking on lead blockers, with the correct shoulder, either forcing run plays into his help, or allowing him to make the plays himself.

DeMario Davis was used a bit more as an edge rusher last week, where he seemed quite comfortable. On one particular play early in the game, Davis came off the edge with great closing speed, and should have had a sack on Wilson, who was forced out of the pocket on the play, but was held by Seattle’s Right Tackle, without a call from the official staring directly at the line of scrimmage. Davis, unfortunately, did have more lapses in coverage last week, however, and seemed to be caught out of position on some run plays. One play that stood out was an edge run to his side, in which Calvin Pace spilled the lead blocker to force the back to the edge, assuming he’d have the help of Davis to make the play, but the rookie linebacker was nowhere to be found, turning what should have been a 1-2 yard gain into about an 8 yard gain. Physically, Davis is proving to be quite substantial, but mentally, he still has lightyears to go.

Marcus Dowtin and Ricky Sapp flashed some of their athleticism and potential, however, there has yet to be a large enough sample of their play to give a fair evaluation at this point. Sapp did make an inexperienced move, however, on Marshawn Lynch’s fumble that, if recovered, would have given the Jets the ball inside the Seattle 10 yard line. Sapp had a clear chance to simply fall on the ball and secure it for New York, but he instead tried to pick it up with a clear path to the endzone, causing him to take his eyes off of it, thus allowing Seattle to pounce on the ball and maintain posession. Hard to fault a guy just signed from the practice squad for wanting to make a game changing play, but fundamentally, this was a major lapse. To use Tannenbaum’s company line, a recovered fumble there may have changed the complexion of the game. Who knows?

Secondary:

Kyle Wilson’s faults are magnified to their highest degree, and rightfully so. Wilson struggles tremendously in man coverage, and is notorious for the finger wag that has been highly documented here at TOJ. However, despite the Golden Tate touchdown on the first drive, Wilson responded rather well, with the exception of his ability to change direction. Wilson did a good job of covering the deep ball after Tate’s touchdown, but where he really struggles is on any type of hitch or comeback routes. His stop and go ability, and route recognition, is quite poor, something that can surely be taken advantage of.

Ellis Lankster has proved to be effective as a blitzer and in some zone coverage schemes, however, like Wilson, he struggles mightily in man coverage. Sidney Rice’s touchdown is a perfect example of his struggles. Lankster completely mugged Rice, who somehow was still able to make the catch over the out of position DB. Unfortunately, like OLB, I am unsure of who else New York could turn to at this point, particularly with Isaiah Trufant recently placed on the injured reserve list.

The Safeties played their usual game – solid against the run, looked for the big hit, and didn’t give up any real significant plays. The only poor play that comes to mind is LaRon Landry’s pass interference penalty in the endzone, but to me, that was a highly questionable call considering there was little contact and the ball seemed rather uncatchable. Landry proved again to be effective in the box, while Bell played another smart game with a high display of veteran savvy.

This Jets team is at a breaking point right now. There are two ways the season can go at this point – somewhat average, or a complete disaster. How they respond this week in St. Louis will be a sign of things to come for the 6 games to follow. Defensively, this unit is a healthy nose tackle and a pass rushing OLB away from being dominant once again. Inside Linebacker may end up being an issue if Davis contiues to struggle mentally, but I don’t neccesarily see that happening. Of course, Harris will need to regain form as well, but he is slowly beginning to play more effectively than not lately.

This week in St. Louis, the Jets front seven seems to hold the advantage against St. Louis’s offensive line, however the key comes down to Danny Amendola. If Rex Ryan and Co. think that they can put Lankster or Wilson on Amendola in man coverage, expect a 8-10 catch, 100+ yard game for the WR. With the way Coples and Wilkerson have been playing, this could easily be the week that they each register a sack. Stop the run, put Cromartie on Amendola, and get Bradford to the ground are all very realistic possibilities that should lead to defensive domination for New York on Sunday.

 

New York Jets Defensive Film Breakdown: Week 5

Chris Gross breaks down the defensive game film from Jets vs. Texans

Another week and another disappointing loss is in the books for the New York Jets following the team’s 2012 Monday Night Football debut, as they fell to the Houston Texans 23-17. However, unlike New York’s week 4 performance against the San Francisco 49ers, the defensive effort from this past week was much more respectable. Outside of a couple of drives, the defense played very well, despite giving up 152 yards on 29 carries to Houston’s Arian Foster. Foster hit a 46 yard run in the first quarter, but take that away, and he finishes with 106 yards on 28 carries, for a 3.7 YPC average, very good numbers against one of the NFL’s best backs.

This week’s game, although still far from perfect, consisted of several excellent individual performers. For this edition of our defensive film breakdown, we will format this column a bit differently. Before getting into each group by position like we have in the past, we will highlight each player considered to be a top performer this week. The remainder of the column will follow as normal. Let’s get right into it.

Week 5 Top Defensive Performers:

Kenrick Ellis – Ellis has been New York’s best defensive lineman through the first month of the season, and that did not change this past Monday. Ellis has arguably the highest motor on the entire team, and is so much more than a pure run stuffing Nose Tackle, despite excelling in that area.

Stepping into the starter’s role against Houston, Ellis did not show any signs of slowing down. As a pure zero technique, Ellis was once again virtually unblockable. He does a great job of recognizing particular blocking schemes, and reacting appropriately to them. He once again proved to be strong and explosive enough to consistently split double teams, but also displayed great agility by not allowing himself to be scooped or cut off by either guard at any particular point during the game. Below is a demonstration of how explosive Ellis really is. He sheds the block of the guard with one arm and makes the tackle right in the hole. Absolute textbook play here.

Ellis also continued to prove to be an extremely hard worker. On certain plays, when lined up further on the outside, as either a 3 technique, or head up on the tackle, he tended to get knocked around a bit, as he is clearly not too familiar with the down block. However, what is most encouraging about Ellis, is that even if he does get beat on a play, it proves to have no effect on his mental state. He follows each play with an even harder effort on the next. On one particular play in the second half, Ellis chased down a Houston screen and made the tackle 30 yards down the field. Most NT’s would never even come close to making such a play. Not only did Ellis make the play, but he did not miss a rep afterwards, and stuffed Arian Foster for a gain of 1 yard only two plays later. The consistency that he displays on film is unparalleled across the entire defensive line.

Ellis’s injury will prove to be a big loss for the Jets. The youngster is really coming into his own, and it is quite unfortunate he will miss the next couple weeks at this pivotal point in the season. However, if Ellis can return and continue to play with the consistency and tenacity that he has displayed thus far, there is no doubt that he will be among the league’s best defensive linemen within the next couple of years.

Antonio Cromartie – No surprise here, but Cromartie played arguably his best game as a Jet this past Monday night. Offensive performance aside, Cromartie was Revis-Like in locking down All-Pro Wide Receiver Andre Johnson, holding the veteran to just 15 yards on 1 reception. What was most impressive about Cromartie, though, was his poise on the field. He assumed the role of the leader of the secondary, and you could just feel his confidence through his demeanor.

His interception of Houston Quarterback Matt Schaub in the first quarter was one of the most impressive displays of man coverage you will ever see. In the media, Cromartie has been discredited on this play due to Schaub making a bad throw. In reality, yes Schaub should not have thrown this pass. However, the quality of the throw had nothing to do with the interception. Cromartie had Johnson blanketed from the initial snap, and Schaub seemingly tried to force the ball to his number one target, in an apparent attempt to test Cromartie as a true number one corner. Perfect coverage, perfect finish.

Rex Ryan – Rex Ryan deserves a ton of credit for putting together a unique defensive game plan against an opponent that his team was clearly overmatched against. Ryan mixed it up in terms of personnel, scheme, packages, and coverages, something we have been waiting for him to do all season long. 1st round selection Quinton Coples finally saw extended reps, and continues to grow with each and every one. 3rd round pick DeMario Davis was mixed in heavily, primarily in 3rd down sub packages, and was used to blitz and drop in coverage.

Schematically, Ryan was extremely creative. Throughout the course of the game, the defense constantly shifted their alignments and disguised pressures and coverages tremendously. On one particular play, Calvin Pace jumped from his normal spot as an outside rusher, to a three technique with his hand on the ground, only to drop in coverage once the ball was snapped. Although Pace is certainly not the fastest player to be put in a role like this, the act of it alone was usually enough to throw the offensive line off.

In the fourth quarter, on a very pivotal 3rd down play, Ryan and the Jets came out in one of the most interesting fronts you will see in this league. Pace and Coples lined up as down lineman, while David Harris, Aaron Maybin, and DeMario Davis lined up as linebackers, all moving around, showing blitz.

The confusion on Houston’s offense line was obvious, as you could see the tackle and guard on the right side trying to communicate some sort of line call before the snap. After the snap, the guard, completely unsure of who to block, allows Calvin Pace to blow right by him and make the tackle for no gain. This is a great example of excellent coaching and schematics being the difference on a particular play.

On to the remainder of the team, per the usual formatting of this column.

Defensive Line

Quinton Coples – Coples saw the the most reps he has seen all season long in this contest. While he still continues to make mistakes that you would expect of someone this early in his career, his talent level is absolutely astronomical. One of the best plays I have seen any defensive lineman on this team make this season came in the second quarter, when Coples was lined up as a 5 technique and came on an inside move. He was so quick off the ball, he was in the backfield while the tackle was hardly out of his stance.

Unfortunately, once he broke through the line, Coples made a very young mistake. Seemingly surprised by how easily he got into the backfield, Coples lost sight of his fundamentals by dropping his head and allowing Arian Foster to spin to the inside and turn a 3 yard loss into a 3 yard gain. Coples needs to realize that his athleticism and talent are going to put him into positions like this, and he cannot be caught off guard when he needs to make a play. As he matures, this is a play he will begin to make more often than not. In his defense, he had a very difficult task at hand in making a one on one tackle with one of the league’s top running backs.

Coples’ pass rush ability is certainly there, but he just needs to put it all together. In this contest, like he has been doing in the previous four, Coples was moved all over the defensive front in passing situations. He lined up as a 1, 3, 5, and 7 technique, and came on stunts to both the inside and outside. He is a bit reckless, but is right on the cusp of getting to the quarterback, something that, once it happens, could become very habitual based on his immense talent level.

Muhammed Wilkerson – While Wilkerson has been seemingly inconsistent all season long, this past week’s game was telling sign of why that notion may be misconstrued. Wilkerson is relied upon to do a number of things in this scheme. Like Coples, he was moved all around the defensive line this past Monday, but in a much greater capacity. When he was lined up at the nose, he played a true nose, rather than stunting. The same goes for when he was lined up as a 3, 5, or 7 technique. Wilkerson is being asked to play just about every position on the defensive front, which certainly speaks to how this coaching staff evaluates his ability. So, while he may seem inconsistent, it is likely more of a case of Wilkerson getting a little dose of everything on the defensive line, and maybe not necessarily being put in a spot where he can get in a consistent rythm. Still, Wilkerson proves to do everything very well, and like Coples, is right on the cusp of becoming a play maker. Either way, the future is very bright for this group based on the talent levels of Wilkerson, Coples, and Ellis.

Mike DeVito – Monday night was undoubtedly DeVito’s best performance of the season. Relentless with his motor, DeVito consistently shuts down any run that comes his way, displaying great recognition for all types of blocking schemes. While he is still virtually useless in rushing the quarterback, his ability to defend the run is among the best on this unit. His tenacity and leadership displayed on the field continued this past Monday night. DeVito also moves around, but more primarily on the inside, from the 1, 3, and 5 technique spots, performing the best as a 3. While he won’t jump off the stat sheet, something he proved once again Monday, his value to this group cannot be duplicated. His motor rubs off on the younger guys, and with Kenrick Ellis, the interior of this defensive line possesses arguably the highest motor of anyone on the team.  A true blue collared player, every defensive line needs a guy like Mike DeVito.

Calvin Pace – The story with pace has been the same for the entire season. He is very fundamentally sound, has great tenacity, but is simply too slow to be overly effective at this point in his career. Pace is very slow in his pass rush and coverage, but still sets the edge better than any player at his position on this roster. Pace has come under heavy scrutiny by the Jets fan base, many calling for his benching. However, from what the other OLBs have shown, there is no one else at this position worthy of taking his spot. Sure, rushing the passer, Pace is very ineffective at this point. However, so are Aaron Maybin and Garrett McIntyre, and neither of them play the run as well as Pace. Why sacrifice what Pace can do against the run for someone who will not be an upgrade? Should he be subbed on 3rd and longs and passing situations? Sure, it would be wise to bring in speed in these situations. However, Pace still remains the best on the roster at this position, and does the little things well enough to keep his job. Don’t expect him to be watching from the sidelines anytime soon. He continues to demonstrate a veteran knowledge of the game, the defense, and fundamentals.

Bryan Thomas – Thomas is generally in the same boat as Pace, however he is nowhere near as fundamentally sound, nor does he posess the same tenacity as Pace. He does a good job at setting the edge, as he displayed the ability to string out outside runs and turn them back inside against Houston. When in space, however, Thomas has serious issues. He lost contain on one end around early in the game which led to a big game, and when Houston came at him again a few series later, he would have been shook in the open field if not for the ball carrier falling down. Thomas, in Kyle Wilson fashion, got up waving his finger as if he made some sort of impressive open field tackle. Still, outside of Pace, I don’t see anyone on the roster who can play the run better at his position.

Aaron Maybin – I’m not sure what there is more of: words in this write up, or the amount of plays that Maybin ended up 5 yards directly behind Matt Schaub in his pass rush. To his credit, Maybin did attempt an inside move, once, in the second half and was completely stonewalled by the offensive tackle and guard. To say his disapointing season continued Monday night would be an understatement.

Damon Harrison Harrison looked promising, but with very limited reps, against a tired offensive line, it is hard to give a fair assessment. This week will tell a lot about where he stands.

The Linebackers – Bart Scott and David Harris were both very hot and cold once again. There were times when they made quick reads, and got to the ball carrier on the drop of a hat. Then there were plays where they were repeatedly sealed by offensive lineman and cut off, opening running lanes for Arian Foster and company to gain more yardage. Their play has been inconsistent, but was not terrible this past Monday. Coverage wise, they could each be better. Harris was roasted by Foster on a route out of the backfield, but in his defense, there aren’t very many linebackers in this league that can match up with him in man coverage.

DeMario Davis saw quality reps, and seems to be getting more comfortable with more playing time. Still, he was not much of a difference maker this week.

Josh Mauga and Garret McIntyre saw a decent amount of action as well. Both play hard, but should really be limited to special teams at this point. McIntyre struggles against the run, despite a great motor.

The Secondary – Outside of Cromartie’s dominant performance, Kyle Wilson seemed to step his play up a bit as well. He did not give up any big plays, and you can see him starting to build some confidence on the field.

The safeties, for the most part, played on an average level. LaRon Landry was used in much more of a free safety role this week, with Yeremiah Bell getting a lot of reps in the box. Both players do not hesitate to stick their noses in on the run, which is good, but can prove to be costly as it was on Owen Daniels’ touchdown reception, on which both Bell and Landry bit on the play action, leaving Houston’s tight end wide open in the middle of the field.

Outside of a few drives, the defense played much better this week. This unit is certainly banged up, heading into week 6 when they will host Andrew Luck and the surging Indianapolis Colts, a game that certainly will not be as easy as it once seemed. Cromartie needs to continue to assert his dominance against Reggie Wayne, and Rex Ryan should be just as creative as he was this week to confuse the rookie and force him to make some mistakes.

No Huddle – Five Under The Radar New York Jets

TJ Rosenthal goes into the No Huddle to look at five under the radar New York Jets

Away from the primetime news and tabloids that will report daily on marquee names wearing the Green and White, are some Jets whose impact could truly be felt. Especially if they develop into next level players.

Or in the case of our choice at number five, are desperately needed to.

Josh Baker:

Baker is a tough and versatile H back who could end up part of the Ground and Pound rotation as a multi purpose guy. One who if portrayed as an unassuming blocker, could find a hole with the rock in his hands.

Of course while drilling a linebacker every now and then when he’s asked to lead the way for someone else. Don’t forget about putting him in motion out of the backfield as a second TE too.

Baker can be used in more ways than John Connor can but 45 is not a prototypical FB like “The Terminator” is. Tony Richardson was once vital to the original Ground and Pound. Maybe even the template for the position. If the Jets simply want a T Rich type of plower to line up at FB, then we’d put our money on Conner getting the bulk of the work. If they want flexibility and unpredictability there, throw in Baker.

Mike DeVito:

DeVito is certainly not unknown to the diehards of Jets nation. However, with Revis Island, recognizable Jet LB’s, the addition of Quinton Coples and two new safeties, the name game simply starts elsewhere on the Jets defense.

This blue collar run stopper is consistent and dependable though. Most importantly, he’s vital to the success of the interior run defense.

Maybe this is the year the Jets, with their youth outside, seal off the edges and force more ball carriers to remain inside. Thus giving Devito more camera time and shots at wrapping up at the line of scrimmage.

Where he usually stops RB’s looking to reach the second level, dead in their tracks.

Great players make solid unheralded ones better. If the young guns around him up front step up and become real threats, then everyone will be hearing about how solid Mike Devito is in 2012. Not just those who tune into SNY after the game.

Jeremy Kerley:

Imagine a Ground and Pound that can freeze LB’s with the play action. When it happens, the Jets won’t always have to work the ball outside in order to finish off the play. How about some short crossing routes to the former TCU speedster right behind those very same linebackers who hedged their bet on a Jet running play?

Kerley showed some toughness on third down as his rookie season wore on. He’s got his professional bearings now, and if Mark Sanchez can use anything out of the gates it’s a dependable yards after catch guy at close range.

Dustin Keller would be the guy better suited for that role you say? Well, so have we for three years now. Maybe a speedster trying to emulate Wes Welker would be the better option this time around. A weapon who could in turn actually free up 81 into becoming what we thought he’d become be two years ago. A serious go to guy.

Watch out for Kerley this year. We just got a feeling…

Chaz Schilens:

OK big tall guy with the 6’4 frame, here’s your chance. Your REAL chance. Rookie Stephen Hill seems penciled in at WR2 opposite Santonio Holmes, but it’s not uncommon in the NFL for a change of scheme and scenery to help do the trick for a 3rd and 4th year player with size and speed.

Can the former Raider finally stay healthy? If so, maybe the Jets have a diamond in the rough on the outside and for tough quick slants, Braylon Edwards style.

On paper it may be Holmes and Hill. In reality, Kerley and Schilens are two who could add depth in a flash to this unit. Perhaps even more.

Greg McElroy:

Now for the doomsday scenario.

No, not the one that has Tim Tebow replacing a struggling Mark Sanchez. Rather, the one that has Greg McElroy forced into action after QB2 gets nicked up while impersonating RB1, and QB1 gets helped off the field after another one of those failed Joe Girardi-taught slides.

Impossible you say? Well keep in mind, that the Jets are the only team to ever lose two starters for the year on consecutive plays remember (Pennington and Fiedler?).

Besides, if a UFO ever landed on Earth in plain sight would you have any doubt in the world that it would take place on the 50 yard line of a Jet game at Met Life? Aliens wearing Tebow jerseys no less. (think of the intergalactic merch potential Woody).

We of course pray that this dark picture being painted here regarding the emergency QB taking over never becomes reality. If it does, let’s just hope that the Wonderlic kid, who for a nanosecond last summer had some of us excited, is able to mange things.

Keep an eye on Alabama Mac in the second half of games this August.  You just never know who may be called upon when the games begin to count for real.

Honorable Mention:

Kyle Wilson:

Step it up kid. Year three. First round picks ought to become quality starters at some point. Corners go down all the time. You ready for this? We think you are. Now go out and dominate this summer.

Prove us right.

New York Jets Fact Or False: Defensive Line Edition

This week’s edition of New York Jets Fact Or False. Chris Gross on what to expect from a revamped Defensive Line this season.

The New York Jets defensive line is poised to have a completely new look this season. With a new coach in Karl Dunbar, the addition of first round pick Quinton Coples, and New York’s intention to use more 4 man fronts this season, here’s a look at what we should and should not expect from the Jets’ D-Line this year in this week’s edition of New York Jets Fact Or False.

1.) Quinton Coples will be Vernon Gholston 2.0. False. The comparisons that have been drawn between Coples and former Jets’ first round bust Vernon Gholston are completely unwarranted. Work ethic, passion, talent, size, speed, and all intangibles could be taken into account to realize that Coples is the superior player, however the key factor that will keep Coples from turning into Big Vern is that he is being brought to New York to play in his natural position as a defensive lineman.

When the Jets drafted Gholston, he was expected to make the conversion from defensive end to outside linebacker in the Jets 3-4 scheme. This transition proves to be extremely difficult for players year in and year out. Many of them fail to successfully make that transition simply because, as a linebacker, the cerebral reaction time can only be attained by few. For defensive lineman, reaction time and play is based primarily on physicality. Defensive linemen rely on their technique and instinct more so than their ability to read opposing offenses and make decisions on the fly. Of course, there is still a cerebral part of the game for defensive lineman in terms of reading the stances of the opposing offensive lineman, their splits, alignment, and where on the field the tight ends and backs are, but it is nowhere near as complicated and dense as it is for a linebacker.

While Rex Ryan has acknowledged the fact that Coples is athletic enough to play that outside linebacker position, he made it clear he is coming to New York to play with his hand on the ground. This is one of the smartest statements Rex has made since becoming the head coach of the Jets. Coples is a natural talent for the position, and has the size (6’6” 280 lbs) to be extremely versatile along the Jets several defensive fronts this season. There is no need to fix what isn’t broken. Coples will prove to be light years ahead of where Vernon Gholston ever was, starting in week one (Remember, all it will take is a single sack).

2.) Outside of Tony Sparano, the addition of Karl Dunbar will prove to be the most significant of the offseason. Fact. Many people forget that for the past two seasons, the Jets have had a secondary coach coaching the defensive line. While Mark Carrier certainly had a solid work ethic, and likely brought everything he had to his job every day, like a player playing out of position, it is extremely difficult for a coach to adapt to an area outside his realm of expertise, particularly in the NFL. Prior to coming to the Jets, Carrier played in the NFL as a Safety from 1990-2000 for Chicago, Detroit, and Washington, respectively. As a coach, Carrier served as the defensive backs coach at Arizona State for two seasons before joining the Baltimore Ravens as the team’s secondary coach from 2006-2009, just prior to joining the Jets, where he was seemingly given an opening on the staff as the Defensive Line Coach, a position in which he had no previous experience. This is a huge reason for New York’s pass rushing woes over the past two years.

Enter Karl Dunbar. As a player, Dunbar was a second-team All-SEC defensive tackle during his career at LSU, before bouncing around the NFL and other various professional football leagues during the early 90s. Following his playing career, Dunbar came onto the coaching scene in 1998 and, besides two seasons as the strength and conditioning coach at LSU, has coached only Defensive Line throughout his entire career.

Dunbar joins the Jets after six seasons with the Minnesota Vikings. During his time in Minnesota, Dunbar orchestrated one of the best d-lines in all of football. Last season, Minnesota led the NFL with 50 total sacks, including a Vikings single season record 22 out of NFC Defensive Player of the year Jared Allen. In fact, since coming under the tutelage of Dunbar, Allen hasn’t had a season with fewer than double-digit sacks, while leading the NFL in the category twice (2007, 2011).

In Dunbar’s six seasons in Minnesota, the Vikings ranked in the top 10 in sacks four different times. In three of those seasons, Minnesota ranked in the top four in the category, two of which led the league. Conversely, Minnesota ranked first in rush defense during Dunbar’s first three seasons, second in his fourth, and in the top eleven during in his final two.

The acquisition of Dunbar is going to pay dividends for the Jets early and often. In Minnesota, Dunbar produced 3 Pro-Bowlers, including Allen, the three time All-Pro Defensive End. Considering he worked with only 4 starters, 75% of his starting line earned trips to the Pro Bowl. Dunbar will undoubtedly be able to maximize the talents of players like Coples, Mohammed Wilkerson, Aaron Maybin, and Sione Pouha. Expect the Jets defensive line to have a completely different look under Dunbar this season.

3.) Quinton Coples will be used solely as a Defensive End. False. Don’t be confused by this. Coples will be used primarily as, but not limited to, a Defensive End, and will see time elsewhere. The common assumption would be to think outside linebacker, however, as previously stated, Coples is coming to New York to play with his hand on the ground. Expect to see several formations that slide Coples to the inside in a defensive tackle role, especially during passing situations.

As a junior at North Carolina, Coples was forced to play defensive tackle for the majority of the season due to the immense amount of players the program lost due to suspension. During his time there, Coples recorded 10 sacks, an astonishing number for an interior defensive lineman. He certainly has the size to compete on the inside, and his speed will give him a superior advantage against guards and centers.

Coples has the potential to turn into what Justin Tuck was early in his career for the Giants, seamlessly switching from the outside and inside on the defensive line, while being able to defend the run and rush the passer from either position. On passing downs, the Jets will likely replicate what so many teams around the league are doing these days by placing their best pass rushers in the game, regardless of their roster position. Don’t be surprised to see Coples and Pouha line up on the interior with Wilkerson and Maybin lining up at end in a variety of passing situations this year.

4.) The Jets will be in a four man front for the majority of their defensive snaps in 2012. Fact. This could very well be 51% to 49%, but don’t be surprised if it is even greater. The Jets know the strength of their team lies in the secondary and in their defensive line depth. While the line backing corps is promising, outside of David Harris there are still some question marks. Bart Scott has reportedly dropped weight and looks rejuvenated in comparison to his play last season. DeMario Davis is turning heads at OTAs, and should eventually prove to be an excellent piece of this defense, but the Jets are wise enough not to depend on the rookie out of Arkansas State too much in his first year. Maybin should have a very promising season, but like Davis, needs to show consistency before the team can lean on him as a pillar of the defense. Bryan Thomas and Calvin Pace are nearing the back end of their careers, and each need to have bounce back years after a disappointing 2011.

In order for the Jets to be successful on defense this season, they need to have their best 11 players on the field for the majority of plays. This includes their defensive line, and their secondary. Although the safety position was a bit of a hole last year, the Jets have certainly addressed the need this off-season by adding LaRon Landry and Yeremiah Bell in free agency, while drafting the young and talented duo of Josh Bush and Antonio Allen. New York also has arguably the best cornerback trio in all of football in Darrelle Revis, Antonio Cromartie, and the up and coming Kyle WIlson.

WIth the addition of Quinton Coples via the draft, the Jets now have one of the most youthful, talented defensive lines in the league. The key for their success will be how they mold together. Mohammed Wilkerson is poised for a breakout season after a very impressive rookie campaign. Then, of course, there is Mike DeVito and Sione Pouha who are the heart and soul of this unit. You won’t see too many flashy numbers from either of these two, but their presence alone, presumably both at defensive tackle in a four man front, will not only help with the development of the young guys, but will command respect from opposing offensive lines across the league. Marcus Dixon and Kenrick Ellis should be able to provide some quality depth as well. This could be a very dangerous group as they develop together throughout training camp and into the season.

5.) Mike DeVito will be far less significant this season than he has been in the past. False. The notion that DeVito is slowly going to ride off into the sunset due to the addition of Coples may hold some truth down the road. However, for this season, that assumption could not be farther from the truth. We already know the Jets’ plan to use more four-man fronts this year, and a big part of that is because of DeVito. Defensive coordinator Mike Pettine and Rex Ryan realize what DeVito brings as a competitor, player, and leader, and have openly acknowledge the importance of getting him on the field.

Outside of his play, DeVito will play a key role in rebuilding the Jets fractured locker room. While this is certainly already in progress, as displayed by the new attitude we have seen from the team thus far, DeVito is at the point in his career in New York where he is respected as an unquestioned leader of this team. DeVito is one of the hardest working, most blue collared players on the entire roster. His influence over the young guys, particularly on the defensive line, will go miles in terms of their development. Coples, Wilkerson, and Ellis are fortunate to be in an environment with a player like DeVito.

6.) At least one player on the Jets defensive line will get double digit sacks this season. Fact. This is an extremely bold prediction considering the fact that the Jets have not had a single player record double digit sacks since John Abraham notched 10.5 in 2005, a six-year drought. However, the Jets have some serious under the radar talent when it comes to pass rushers. Aaron Maybin, who will likely fluctuate between linebacker and defensive end this year, led the Jets with six sacks last season after missing the first four games. With a full season ahead of him, combined with a complete off-season with the team, and the fact that he has added over 10 lbs since the end of last year, Maybin could turn into a significant force in the Jets pass rush.

Aside from Maybin, Muhammed Wilkerson is due for a big year after his impressive rookie campaign in which he started from day one and recorded 3 sacks. Quinton Coples’ talent level alone will give him the potential to achieve this accomplishment in each year of his career, however he will be asked to live up to that potential and rise to the occasion very early for Gang Green. How he handles this will ultimately be the key to his success, and should determine his degree of achievement.

Each of these young men should benefit greatly from the new scheme, as well as the addition of Dunbar. There is far too much talent and potential on this unit for someone to not reach the double-digit mark in sacks. Adding the expert that is Dunbar will surely maximize that potential, and ultimately allow a player to reach this feat.

New York Jets: Building Towards A 4-3 Defense

The New York Jets are putting the pieces in place to spend more time in the 4-3 this season

Rex Ryan has never been hesitant about using a variety of defensive looks since becoming the head coach of the New York Jets. However, they have predominantly been a 3-4 team. After a disappointing 2011 season, it appears the Jets will looking to use more 4-3 alignments this season and will be looking for different things out of a few key players in their system.

Surprisingly, defensive line has developed into the deepest position on the Jets roster. They have one of the best nose tackles in football in Sione Pouha, a promising second year player in Muhammad Wilkerson and one of the league’s better run stoppers in Mike DeVito. Behind them, Marcus Dixon was very good off the bench last year at both defensive end and defensive tackle. Last year’s third round pick Kenrick Ellis has the physical potential to be a force inside and Martin Tevaseau is a capable rotation player. Finally, they surprised many by selecting defensive end Quinton Coples in the first round.

On the other hand, the Jets have many questions at linebacker outside of David Harris. Calvin Pace is coming off his worst season with the team and appears to have lost his burst getting after the quarterback. Bart Scott is also coming off his worst season with the team and is a major liability on passing downs. Bryan Thomas is going to be 33 years old and is coming off major surgery. Aaron Maybin is a hybrid defensive end/linebacker and is predominantly just a pass rush threat. Demario Davis has plenty of potential but is ultimately still a third round rookie.

Outside of Maybin (who is built like a safety), the Jets have asked their linebackers to lose weight and improve their speed. Pace and Thomas are going to spend more time being pure linebackers instead of having different formations where they put their hand in the dirt because the Jets have enough capable defensive lineman.

It is a smart move by Rex Ryan to cater his defense to his depth chart. These is no need to fit square pegs in round holes. You play to your strengths and the Jets strength should be their defensive line more so than their linebackers. Ryan wisely hired a defensive line coach in Karl Dunbar, who was coaching a 4-3 in Minnesota to help with this adjustment. The Jets have a versatile front with most players being able to slide between defensive tackle and defensive end. Ryan should be able to send out a myriad of lineups that could both stop the run and rush the passer.

For example, a line-up with DeVito and Pouha at defensive tackle with Coples and Wilkerson at end, should be capable against the run while still getting push to the quarterback. On third downs, you could slide Coples inside to defensive tackle, bring Aaron Maybin in at end and then replace Bart Scott with Demario Davis or an extra safety to get after the quarterback.

Regardless of what the Jets de facto starting line-up ends up being, expect to see four to five defensive lineman getting major reps throughout the game while a player like Bryan Thomas could end up playing less than 50% of the snaps. It is also hard to see a scenario where Pace and Scott don’t see a decline in their reps.

The Jets strength on defense is cornerback and defensive line, Rex Ryan should be smart enough to build his game-plans around these two positions.

New York Jets: Who Could Be On The Trading Block?

What New York Jets could be on the trading block in the coming weeks?

We have documented Mike Tannenbaum’s propensity for getting involved in trade market here at TOJ last week, so with that in mind which current players on the Jets roster could be on the trading block?

Please Take Him

Wayne Hunter, Right Tackle – We have already discussed the futility of trading Hunter but apparently a NFC team actually engaged the Jets in discussion for him. I can’t see them finding a willing trade partner, even for a conditional seventh round draft pick. Most likely Hunter will be brought back as a highly paid backup.

Bart Scott, Inside Linebacker – Similar to Hunter, there isn’t going to be much of a market for Scott. Maybe…maybe if a team suffered an injury at linebacker, they’d give up a late round conditional pick for him. However, are the Jets going to hold on to him that long? I can’t see him lasting with the team much longer when he clearly wants more playing time and the Jets aren’t going to give it to him.

Reasonable Market

Calvin Pace, Outside Linebacker – Pace has a contract that exceeds his actual production but that doesn’t mean he isn’t an effective player, particularly as a run stopper in a 3-4 defense. The Jets would love to dump his hefty contract but whomever they trade him to, would likely want to renegotiate with him first. He is a player they could get some decent value for and might be somebody they need to part with in their quest to fill their long list of needs. They could carry on at outside linebacker by signing Jarret Johnson, bringing back Bryan Thomas on a veteran’s minimum deal and then picking a player like Melvin Ingram in round one.

Mike DeVito, Defensive End – The Jets could save 3 million this year by parting ways with DeVito, a valuable run stopper in the 3-4 defense. Yes, he is a good player and a strong fit in Rex Ryan’s defense but he had issues staying healthy last year as a full time player and the Jets have decent depth behind him with Marcus Dixon, Ropati Pitoitua, and the potential of Kenrick Ellis sliding over for reps as he continues to grow. DeVito would be highly coveted by any team who runs a 3-4 and needs help at defensive end.

High Value

Dustin Keller, Tight End – A player who has been good, not great for the Jets and might never get the chance to be great in Tony Sparano’s offensive system. Keller’s skill set, which includes plenty of receiving but not alot of blocking could thrive in the right offense. Would the Jets part with Mark Sanchez’s best friend and a player he has good chemistry with on the field? Probably not but if the right offer comes along that helps them improve safety, offensive tackle, linebacker…they just might.

Antonio Cromartie, Cornerback – In order to improve other parts of their defense, the Jets could look to pick away at one of their strengths at cornerback. Kyle Wilson took positive steps last year and if the right offer came along for Cromartie, wouldn’t you have to consider moving him and giving your previous first round draft pick a chance to start?

TOJ Top Five: Most Underrated Jets

We continue our TOJ top five series today, with a look at the five most underrated players on the Jets roster

Previous TOJ Top Fives

5. Matt Slauson – He stepped in for future Hall of Famer Alan Faneca at left guard last year and turned in an admirable performance. There were early season struggles, which were to be expected from a second year 6th round pick who had no experience his rookie year but he got much more steady as the season went on. The Jets running game was still one of the league’s best and Jets quarterbacks were sacked two times less in 2010 than they were in 2009. For at least the next few years, it looks like Slauson will be the answer at left guard.

4. Mike DeVito – Similar to Slauson, moved into the starting line-up last season and didn’t allow the Jets to miss a beat at his respective position. DeVito took over at defensive end, where he is solid against the run and fits well into Rex Ryan’s scheme. In 2010, he finished with 59 tackles, 4 tackles for a loss, and 2 forced fumbles.

3. Bryan Thomas – Every year there is talk about the need to replace him but every year he maintains his starting position and produces. Thomas led the Jets in sacks last season with 6 and figures to spend another season as a starter at outside linebacker, doing many of the little things that are necessary for the Jets defense to succeed.

2. Sione Pouha – Nose tackle is a crucial position in Rex Ryan’s 3-4 defense and the past two years Pouha has stepped in for an injured Kris Jenkins without the Jets missing a beat. After a surprisingly productive 2009 season, Pouha got even better last year and finished with 59 tackles, 2 sacks, and 3 fumbles recovered. He also isn’t too shabby with a camera in his hand:

1. Brandon Moore – One of the top guards in the NFL who is frequently overshadowed by Nick Mangold and D’Brickashaw Ferguson. Moore has been a model of consistency on the Jets offensive line by starting 105 straight regular season games for the team at right guard. He has been a huge part of the team’s success running the ball in recent years and hopefully will receive Pro Bowl recognition at some point.

Thoughts On Ongoing Jets Off-Season Workouts

Click here for more coverage of the New York Jets off-season workouts

1. Great work by Sione Pouha organizing the Jets defensive lineman for workouts in North Jersey. This is a group that will have some new pieces in the rotation with draft picks Muhammad Wilkerson and Kenrick Ellis, along with Ropati Pitoitua coming off season ending surgery now in the mix. It is also encouraging to hear that Shaun Ellis will join the workouts later in the week, considering his status with the team is up in the air. Let’s hope any work Wilkerson gets in the off-season will contribute to him making some type of immediate impact whenever the season starts.

2. It is encouraging to hear Mark Sanchez talk about putting together full team workouts, if the lockout continues to carry on. He stated he thinks somewhere around 50 players would show up, which would be great since New England only has around 40…every victory counts, right?

3. Speaking of New England, what is with the paranoia of keeping the media away from your team workouts? Did the secrecy pay off last year in January? Nobody is stealing the information about what routes you are running on air.

4. Jamaal Westerman is taking part in the defensive line workouts and had also worked out with Bart Scott and a few other Jets at the TEST facility in Martinsville, New Jersey earlier in the off-season. It is good to see Westerman getting after it, as he will have a chance to maybe contribute in some of the Jets defensive packages this season considering their depth chart at linebacker.

Click here for more coverage of the New York Jets off-season workouts

Underappreciated Lineman Anchor Jets Defense

There was no question the New York Jets needed to upgrade their defensive line this off-season. They had issues with their depth and struggled to consistently get after the quarterback. However, that doesn’t diminish the fact their defense was ranked third in the NFL last season at stopping the run and managed to generate enough of a pass rush to knock both Petyon Manning and Tom Brady out of the playoffs.

Two-thirds of the Jets starting defensive line are relative no-name players who don’t necessarily fit in with their big name, big talking counterparts. Sione Pouha and Mike DeVito have both very quietly developed into quality NFL starters and are a big part of why the Jets defense has been so successful the past two years.

Pouha has admirably stepped in for an injured Kris Jenkins in both 2009 and 2010. Jenkins was released this year, leaving Pouha as the official full time starting nose tackle. He is coming off a career year, where he racked up 59 tackles, 2 sacks, and 3 recovered fumbles. A 3rd round draft pick of the Jets in 2005, Pouha has fought off early injuries in his career and multiple coaching changes to develop into the starting nose tackle on one of the league’s best defenses. The Jets drafted Kenrick Ellis in the third round this season, who should be able to spell him and could eventually develop into his replacement a few years down the road.

Mike DeVito is an undrafted free agent from Maine, now entering his fifth year with the Jets. He has clawed his way up from being an extra body in training camp, to the practice squad, to a rotational player and now finally to being a starting defensive end. The Jets showed confidence in him before last season by letting Marques Douglas walk in free agency, which left the starting job to DeVito. He responded with 59 tackles, 4 tackles for a loss, and 2 forced fumbles. He is a good fit in Ryan’s scheme and is solid against the run.

The Jets first round pick Muhammad Wilkerson will likely replace Shaun Ellis in the starting line-up, if not this year, than likely next year. He should provide a pass rush out of the defensive end position, while DeVito can continue to plug up the run.

When discussing the Jets defense, it is usually names like Darrelle Revis, David Harris, Bart Scott, and Calvin Pace that come up first. However, don’t discount the production they are getting from blue-collar players like Pouha and DeVito.