Turn On The Jets Film Room – Oday Aboushi: Guard or Tackle?

Mike Nolan steps into the TOJ Film Room to take a look at Rookie OL Oday Aboushi to determine where he might fit in the Jets offense.

If you search the internet for anything about Oday Aboushi, you will find a lot more hits than the typical 5th round pick. Most of the articles are about how he is one of the first Palestinian-Americans to play in the NFL.  The more I read about Oday Aboushi the more impressed I am with him as a person. In fact, he was once honored at the US State Department by Hillary Clinton for being an inspirational Muslim athlete. Now that the dust has settled in the aftermath of the NFL Draft and Jets fans have learned a little bit about who Oday Aboushi is as a person, it is time to figure out who he is as a player and where he might be able to fit in the Jets’ offense.

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Turn On The Jets Film Room – Jeff Cumberland – Capable Starter?

The Turn On The Jets film room breaks down tight end Jeff Cumberland. Can he be a capable full time starter for the New York Jets?

We are back in the film room at Turn On The Jets with a look today at presumptive starting tight Jeff Cumberland. Check out our recent previous breakdowns of Stephen Hill, Brian Winters, Mike Goodson, the Defensive Line and WIllie Colon

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New York Jets Defense – Who Can Play Slot Corner?

Joe Caporoso goes into the film to explain the Jets 4-2 nickel slide defense and who could play slot corner next year

One of Rex Ryan’s favorite defenses last season was the 4-2 nickel slide. We discussed it briefly in this article overviewing the Jets defense but basically it replaces a linebacker with an extra defensive back, who flexes out over the slot receiver, while the Jets move down to a 4 man front.

One of the most critical positions in this defense and one of the most critical positions in today’s NFL for any defense is the slot corner. Here are a few different articles discussing the position in depth from Pro Football Focus and ESPN but generally it is your nickel back, who will be responsible for covering the slot receiver, along with playing in the box to provide run support and in Rex Ryan’s defense will be asked to blitz off the edge relatively frequently.

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Turn On The Jets Film Room – Stephen Hill – Hope For 2013?

Joe Caporoso steps into the film room and takes a closer look at Stephen Hill’s rookie year

Throughout the off-season we will step into the film room and provide a closer look at various players on the New York Jets roster. If there is a player in particular you’d like to see a review on, leave a note in the comment section or shoot us a Tweet with the hashtag #TOJFilmRoom

The New York Jets spent a 2nd round pick on wide receiver Stephen Hill in the 2012 NFL Draft. Possessing an elite combination of size (6-4, 215 pounds) and speed (4.36 forty time), Hill has immense physical potential as a NFL wide receiver but there were a few concerning things about him coming out of Georgia Tech.

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Film Room – Solving The Sanchez Problem

Steve Bateman breaks down the film to demonstrate three of Mark Sanchez’s biggest problems

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In recent days and weeks there’s been a great deal of attention directed towards the New York Jets search for new staff. Yet while it’s understandable that fans are anxious to learn who’ll be hiring the players and calling the plays next season, arguably the most important addition at Florham Park this year may also be one of the least heralded: with Mark Sanchez’s career now seemingly at tipping point, the man who’s hired to replace Matt Cavanaugh as QB coach could well be the pivot around which the team’s fortunes turn.

Sanchez was bad this season – there’s no doubting that – but to give us a better idea of where it all went wrong (and where work needs to be done this off-season) let’s take a look at a few plays from 2012 that highlight some of his greatest difficulties all too clearly…

We’ll begin by considering Sanchez’s difficulty in making pre-snap reads, and there’s no better example to be found than back in Week 2 against the Miami Dolphins. The game’s tied at 10 apiece in the third quarter, and the Jets are facing a 3rd & Goal from the 7-yard line. Although the Jets appear to be out in a 4 WR set, they are actually in 11 personnel (1 RB, 1 TE) with Jeff Cumberland split wide to the right (Picture 1, below). The Dolphins have responded with their big nickel package.

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The play has been designed with Stephen Hill (yellow route) as the primary receiver while to his outside Cumberland runs a short hook in order that Hill can draw single coverage in the back of the endzone.

As a QB making his pre-snap read, the first thing that Sanchez has to be aware of is his protection scheme. The Dolphins are showing a 7-man pass rush (4 down linemen along with 2 LBs plus 1 safety (circled in red) all showing blitz). Consequently, there’s a very good chance that the Jets’ 6-man protection scheme (the 5 offensive linemen plus RB Bilal Powell) will be overwhelmed.

This initial read should also trigger a red-hot awareness that if the three circled defenders are all blitzing, the center of the field will be left absolutely unprotected. Suddenly, to any QB who’s confident about his ability to adapt a play at the line of scrimmage (Aaron Rodgers and Tom Brady are masters of this) Santonio Holmes (purple route) becomes the most appealing option on the field.

As the play develops (Picture 2) the abandoned tract of center-field looms large (green area) as Holmes gains a step on his defender and breaks into it. Meanwhile, there’s a problem with the play design as Cumberland has taken his route too deep, meaning that the window where Sanchez had been hoping to deliver the ball (red area) is now effectively double-covered. The play can still be aborted, however, and the lead can be taken via a straightforward field goal if a pass is delivered to either of the yellow areas.

Picture 2
Picture 2

The fact that despite all of this Sanchez dumbly floats the ball straight into the most dangerous area of the field (where it’s intercepted by Chris Clemons) is concerning to say the least (Picture 3). Not only does it indicate an unwillingness to deviate from the playbook by pulling the plug and taking a safe option, it also suggests that he entirely failed to compute how the blitzing LBs and safety would impact on the route being run by Holmes (who is now absolutely wide open in the endzone). This is one area where Sanchez simply must show considerable improvement between now and September.

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The second problem that we’ll consider is Sanchez’s difficulty in knowing when to swallow the ball and take a sack. Here we’ll look at why this is such a problem by looking back at the Week 13 clash against the Arizona Cardinals.

Below we see the Jets about to run a play-action pass from 21 personnel (2 RBs, 1 TE) on 1st & 10 from their own 12-yard line, while the Cardinals are in a base 3-4 package (Picture 4). Although the player movements are detailed, they are not that important except for the those of the two middle linebackers (red) who will blitz the A-gap (ie the small space between the center and the guards on either side of him).

Picture 4
Picture 4

In next to no time the blitz has leaked into the backfield and Sanchez is under intense pressure (Picture 5). For reasons unknown, Sanchez apparently becomes briefly seized by the belief that he’s the greatest QB to have ever played the game and attempts a ridiculous throw from an absolutely horrible position where one leg is in the air while the other is balanced on tiptoe. (I often compare playing QB to boxing in that there’s very little difference between the techniques that allow for the throwing of a powerful, accurate punch and a similarly lethal pass. I probably don’t need to point out that Muhammad Ali’s success wasn’t built on a tendency to throw punches while falling over backwards and tiptoeing on one leg).

Picture 5
Picture 5

Unsurprisingly the ball wobbles out of Sanchez’s hand and loops into midfield where former Jet Kerry Rhodes immediately breaks on the throw and makes as easy an interception as he’s ever likely to. Thanks entirely to Sanchez’s difficulty in accepting that sometimes it’s best to take one for the team, the Cardinals have a 1st & 10 from the Jets 26-yard line. If Sanchez is to retain his role as the Jets’ starting QB in 2013 he must come to understand his limitations: while it’s great to believe in one’s own abilities, self-delusion is a surefire road to ruin.

Our last consideration is a problem that’s haunted Sanchez throughout his professional career, namely an inability to look off a safety so as to secure single coverage for a receiver running a deep pattern. Let’s look at an example taken from the Week 15 match-up against the Tennessee Titans…

We’re into the final quarter and the Jets are trailing 14-10. The Jets are once again in 21 personnel and are matched up against a 3-deep zone defense run from the Cardinals’ 4-3 under package (Picture 6). Braylon Edwards (circled) is the intended target on the play, and safety Michael Griffin is highlighted in green.

Picture 6
Picture 6

Although he briefly scans center-field to establish whether or not both safeties have dropped deep (thereby giving himself an easy read of the coverage scheme) Sanchez soon switches his gaze towards Edwards (Picture 7).

Picture 7
Picture 7

Griffin backpedals but keeps his head turned towards Sanchez so that he can read his eyes as he continues staring at Edwards (Picture 8).

Picture 8
Picture 8

This enables him to commit towards the direction of the throw before it’s even been released, with the result that despite Edwards’s wily attempts to act as defender and knock the ball away, Griffin is in exactly the right place at exactly the right time and is consequently able to collect an easy pick (Picture 9).

Picture 9
Picture 9

In conclusion, although these problems are by-and-large correctable through coaching it would be foolish to presume that the new QB guru – whoever he may be – will have an easy task in helping to resurrect Sanchez’s tarnished reputation. Because while it’s possible to identify the errors and implement drills that are designed to correct them, the only person capable of righting these wrongs is Sanchez himself.

Will he ever learn? I guess that’s the eight million dollar question.