New York Jets – 2012: The Year of the Sanchize

Mike Donnelly on why the absence of Brian Schottenheimer will mean a career year for Mark Sanchez

Since Sunday’s offensive explosion against the Bills, I have seen many different reactions from media experts, Jets fans, Jets haters, and everyone in between (except Evan Silva, of course, who must have had far too much egg on his face to give his take on the game) in regard to the Jets offense, and Mark Sanchez in particular. Some have expressed shock, while others felt somewhat vindicated after believing in the Sanchize all along. The overriding question from everyone, though, is can Sanchez keep this going? Well, not only is he is going to keep it going and mature into the franchise quarterback many expected him to be, I’m going to show you why the writing was all over the wall heading into this season, and we should have expected a big year. I can tell you why that is the case in two simple words:

Brian. Schottenheimer.

Yes, it’s easy (and fun) to take shots at the incompetent former Jets offensive coordinator, but there is good reason for that. When you look back at his coaching career, the thing that sticks out like a sore thumb is the lack of development and overall production amongst the quarterbacks he works with. Don’t believe me? Check it out:

2001 – Brian’s dad, Marty, brought him on as the QB coach for his final season in Washington. The quarterbacks that season combined to throw for 13 touchdowns, complete 54% of their passes, and compile a 71.1 quarterback rating. NOT BAD!

2002-2005 – Brian followed his daddy to San Diego, which was likely the only way he’d get a job in the NFL. During his time in San Diego, he was charged with developing 2001 draft pick Drew Brees, who you may know as the future hall-of-famer that last season threw for the most yards in a single season ever. Over the course of four years with Schotty, we saw Brees get benched, the Chargers use the #4 overall pick in the draft to take another quarterback (yes, I know they technically had the #1 pick and traded Eli for Rivers, but for all intents and purposes, they took Philip Rivers), and Brees topped out at 3,576 yards passing in a season.

Brees was respectable his last two years in San Diego, but the team thought so little of his progression, they let him leave as a free agent. As soon as he left Brian Schottenheimer’s control and moved on to New Orleans, he went on to make 5 pro bowls in 6 years, threw for 4,418 with a 96.2 qb rating the VERY NEXT year after leaving Schotty, and just two years later threw for over 5,000 yards and 34 TD’s. Interesting. Meanwhile…

2006-2011 – Yes, meanwhile, Schotty somehow parlayed that poor stretch into the Jets offensive coordinator position. In his first two years with the Jets, Chad Pennington was the quarterback for most of the time. During that period, Chad put together an 83.3 quarterback rating. Not bad, but not great. The VERY NEXT year, in 2008 as a Miami Dolphin (being coached by Tony Sparano, who you may have heard of), Chad Pennington had a qb rating of 97.4 and finished 2nd in the MVP voting. Hmm..

Who did the Jets replace Chad with? Why, Brett Favre of course! Favre was coming off a season in which he racked up 4,155 yards, 28 TD, 15 interceptions, and a qb rating of 95.7. Seems like a slam dunk trade-up right? Well, Favre went from those numbers in 2007 to these with Schottenheimer in 2008: 3,472 yards, 22 td, 22 int, and a qb rating of 81. So he threw for approximately 700 less yards, 6 less td, and 7 more interceptions. Was it because Favre was in decline or washed up? Nope. The following season after leaving Schottenheimer, Favre returned to dominance, throwing for 4,202 yards, 33 td, 7 interceptions and a qb rating of 107.2. Very interesting.

Judging by that track record, there wasn’t a coach in the league I would have less trusted the fortunes of #5 overall pick Mark Sanchez with (that was just part of the Jets whole how NOT to develop a QB strategy), but that’s just what the Jets did. Sanchez has largely struggled through his first three seasons under Schotty, despite flashes of great play and undeniable talent. Entering this season, Sanchez finally got a chance to work with a competent offensive NFL coach: Tony Sparano. With the Dallas Cowboys in 2006, head coach Bill Parcells entrusted Sparano with “raising” young qb Tony Romo. In his first season as the starter, Romo came out of nowhere to make the Pro Bowl and take the first step toward being a top quarterback. With Sparano calling the plays, the Cowboys made the playoffs and had a top 5 offense, despite working in a young, inexperienced quarterback. Sparano clearly has a track record when it comes to helping quarterbacks play to the best of their ability.

In week 1, we saw bits and pieces of what Sparano brings to the table. The offense was organized, they exploited mismatches, and players were put in position to best use their talents. A novel concept, right? Unlike in previous seasons, the offense got off to a fast start and clearly showed they had a good game plan that they trusted. Sanchez played with confidence, looked in command of the offense, and most importantly, was put in a position to succeed, instead of being forced to repeatedly try to jam his square peg into a circle hole. Will the offense always click like it did in week 1? No, of course not. But if history has taught us anything, it’s that Mark Sanchez was due for a major increase in production this season and those of us who believed in him all along may have the last laugh. So to answer all the “experts” and pundits, no, week 1 was not a fluke, and if you were paying attention you’d see it was about to happen. So let’s buckle up and enjoy the ride this year. And we can thank Brian Schottenheimer later,  but not because he did a good job or anything. Because he left.

New York Jets: How NOT To Develop A Young Quarterback

New TOJ writer Mike Donnelly has found excerpts of the book the New York Jets have written – “How NOT To Develop A Young Quarterback”

Turn On The Jets would like to welcome our newest assistant staff writer, Mike Donnelly on board. Mike was previously writing for You Don’t Know Football and freelancing for his own site on the New York Jets. Make sure you follow him on Twitter – 

When the New York Jets made the shocking trade for Tim Tebow earlier this offseason, people had many different takes and opinions on it. Beyond just the normal Jets-bashing and Tebow-trashing, some people loved the move because of Tebow’s running ability and some people hated it, mainly due to the effect it would have on Mark Sanchez both on and off the field. Sanchez is a fine young quarterback who has improved each year and had a lot of success — despite what his detractors say — so the Tebow trade was a curious one.

I did a little digging however, and found out there was a method to the madness. If it seemed like the Jets as an organization were going out of their way to push Sanchez to the side and stunt his development, it’s because they were, and this was just the latest in a series of questionable decisions. Apparently, in their never-ending quest for more publicity, the Jets decided to see how far they can push this thing and publish the first ever “How NOT to Develop Your Young Quarterback” handbook. Luckily, I was able to get my hands on a rough copy and will share some excerpts with you.

Chapter One“What you want to do is hire a defensive Head Coach who has no interest in the offense whatsoever. The real trick, though, is you want to give the keys to the entire offense to an unqualified coordinator who has had no success in the NFL at all. In our case, that man was Brian Schottenheimer. Schotty had been here for three years already by the time we drafted Mark, and before that he was the quarterbacks coach in San Diego. It was during that time that Drew Brees had the worst years of his career before moving to New Orleans and carving out a Hall of Fame career under new coaches. We knew Schotty would do a pretty bad job, but we had to be absolutely sure we couldn’t let Sanchez improve at all. That’s why we also hired Matt Cavanaugh to come in and be the QB’s coach in 2009, and that was a major coup for us…”

Wow. If the goal was really to hire two incompetent coaches to coach the offense and Mark Sanchez specifically, they did a great job with these two. First, let’s start with Schottenheimer. By now everybody knows how bad of a job he did here and that his offense was too complicated and too ineffective. Chad Pennington even had a tough time grasping it. Brett Favre basically ignored it. Many current players complained about it. Let’s quickly take a look at some of Schotty’s failures:

  • 95.7 and 107.2. Those are Brett Favre’s QB ratings the year before and after he worked with Schotty, respectively. His rating with Schotty? 81.0 to go along with his 22 interceptions.
  • Chad Pennington’s QB rating with Schotty over 2 years: 83.3. The year he left? 97.4 and a 2nd place MVP finish. Hmm.
  • 16 straight games, including 3 playoff contests, where he couldn’t come up with a game plan to score a 1st quarter touchdown
  • 58 straight weeks without a 300 yard passer between 2006 and 2010
  • Passing offense never finished higher than 16th in NFL

And it is not like Cavanaugh helped matters. Before coming to the Jets to mentor Sanchez, he was the offensive coordinator at Pittsburgh University where his claim to fame was being part of the brain trust that decided to start Tyler Palko at QB over future NFL 1st round pick Joe Flacco. Prior to that, he was the offensive coordinator for the Baltimore Ravens during the era where their offensive ineptitude was the butt of many jokes. During his last three years on the job, the passing offense ranked 27th, 32nd,  and 31st. A perfect candidate to come in and help a young QB become a great passer! He was clearly everything the Jets were looking for in their handbook.

Chapter 4 – “Once you’ve established that the young QB won’t get any competent coaching, the next thing you want to do is take away anything he’s familiar with and not let him get into any kind of comfort zone. So what we did is change the receivers Mark would be throwing to every season. The thinking was, if he we let him get comfortable and grow with any receivers, his stats would improve, and that’s a no-no. In 2011 we even took it a step further and not only did we take away the two receivers he was most familiar with, we replaced them with two guys who couldn’t run anymore! It was great…”

The Jets did a great job adhering to this. In 2009, the first receiver Sanchez got comfortable with was Chansi Stuckey, so he was traded by week 5. They brought in Braylon Edwards, though, which was actually a great thing for Sanchez. Too great of a thing, apparently, because just a year and a half later he was gone. In 2010, Santonio Holmes was brought in, but due to his 4 game suspension, it took a while for him and Sanchez to get on the same page. With the trio of Edwards, Holmes, and Cotchery, Sanchez had an excellent, young corps of receivers to work with. So naturally the whole thing was blown up after the 2010 season that nearly ended in a Super Bowl. Edwards was let go, Cotchery was released, and they were replaced by the decrepit Derek Mason and fresh from prison Plaxico Burress. The Jets apparently didn’t ask Plaxico to work out for them or run a 40 yard dash before signing, probably because they didn’t have a sun dial available. So not only was Sanchez left without a deep threat, but he had to break in these new receivers during a lockout without coaches being present. No big deal.

Later in Chapter 4“And just to be sure the quarterback won’t be comfortable at all, you might want to go ahead and weaken his offensive line a great deal. Nothing frazzles a QB more than being hit every play, so we decided to put Wayne Hunter at tackle and back him up with Vlad Ducasse. Doesn’t get much worse than that! Speaking of backups, make sure you have none, so if one of your starters like Nick Mangold does get injured, your QB will get buried…”

Well, this strategy definitely did work. Gotta give them credit.

Chapter 8“If you’ve come this far, it means you’ve done everything you physically can to your QB to make sure he fails. Now it’s time to work on the mental side and really ruin his confidence. It will be hard to top what we did, because a guy like Tim Tebow only comes along once in a lifetime, but if possible, you have to bring in an extremely popular player to back up your quarterback. That way, every time he throws an incomplete pass or messes up, the whole crowd  will be pushing for the backup to play, even if he can’t throw a forward pass! Plus the entire media will report on every little move he makes and make it nearly impossible for him to not crack under the pressure. This is an important step in the process here…”

Well, they were right about it being hard for future teams to one-up them when it comes to Tebow. In fact, I don’t think any starting QB that has had the success Sanchez has, has ever had to deal with something like Tim Tebow being brought in and getting on the field for up to 20 plays per game every Sunday. The Jets really broke new ground with this one. It was a nice touch added on also to have Matt Cavanaugh criticize Sanchez publicly while also talking about how wonderful Tim Tebow is. Smooth.

Look, I’m a big Mark Sanchez supporter and fan. I think he’s gotten a bum rap, and it’s totally undeserved. People seem to forget that he only just completed his 3rd season in the league, and is actually ahead of where many other star players were at the same point in their careers, just look at Drew Brees’ stats early in his career. Or even better, look at Eli Manning, who many Giants fans wanted to run out of town after 3 years.

There are lots of similarities between Sanchez and Eli that go beyond just the stats. After Eli’s third year, they fired the offensive coordinator who wasn’t using Eli to the best of his abilities and became way too predictable. Sound familiar? They replaced him with Kevin Gilbride, a former Head Coach who had success as an offensive coach prior to flopping as Head Coach. Again, sound familiar? I hope the Jets took some notes. The Giants let Eli work out his problems, progress, and late in Year 4, Eli started to “get it”. He cut out the silly mistakes, grasped the offense that suited his skills, and he led them to the Super Bowl. I’m not saying that’s what will happen this year with Mark Sanchez, but he deserves the opportunity to do so. Mark Sanchez has proven he can handle the big stage in the past, and I wouldn’t bet against him rising up and doing so again.

Thoughts On New York Jets New Offensive Staff

Thoughts on the New York Jets finally moving on from Brian Schottenheimer and hiring Tony Sparano

A collection of thoughts on the New York Jets decision to officially make former Miami Dolphins head coach Tony Sparano their new offensive coordinator –

1. You could have replaced Brian Schottenheimer with Paul Hackett and Jets fans would have been happy. Yet, I have to say that my initial reaction is positive to the decision to hire Sparano. Why? The Jets went outside the organization. They didn’t make the easy choice and hand the job to Bill Callahan. Rex is taking on a different kind of personality than himself but one that has the potential to mesh very well with him. What is important about Sparano is that he a disciplinarian and believes in running the football, which fits the identity this team has been successful with. The discipline is badly needed on offense as well.

2. This hiring will feel better if the Jets officially lock down Todd Haley to handle the quarterbacks/passing game. Haley and Sparano have worked together before and both come from the Parcells coaching tree. Haley will be the necessary in the face presence to Mark Sanchez that Brian Schottenheimer wasn’t. You won’t catch Haley and Sanchez playing grade school pranks on each other like we saw Schotty and Sanchez do on Hard Knocks.

3. It shouldn’t be all rainbows and sunshine when discussing these moves. There are reasons Sparano and Haley were fired and both have question marks surrounding how well they could work together in this capacity. It could be a dangerous situation to have one coach focused on the run and another focused on the pass. There needs to be one unified voice and plan. If Haley doesn’t come on board, the Jets need to find somebody else to work on developing Mark Sanchez.

4. Sparano hasn’t called plays since 2006 with the Dallas Cowboys, a season in which he was very successful at it. Obviously, many fans are clamoring about the use of the Wildcat. I am sure we will see some of it next season, particularly as Jeremy Kerley becomes a bigger part of the offense. However, the real question is what the backfield will look like next season. Is the 1-2 punch of Shonn Greene and Joe McKnight going to be enough, or will they look to add somebody in free agency? Beyond that, blocking tight end and right tackle also remain a big priority.

5. Sanchez is getting a new system. There is no more Schottenheimer scapegoat. I will get more into the criticism of him tomorrow. Yet, it is hard to deny that this will be a make or break season for him.

New York Jets: Schottenheimer Out, Sparano In, Sanchez Ripped

It has been an eventful day for the New York Jets to say the least

You thought the New York Jets would stay out of the headlines just because their season was over?

Think again.

First off, as expected Brian Schottenheimer was let go as offensive coordinator. It is being painted as a resignation but common sense here people, the Jets pushed him out the door. This is a move that will be celebrated by 99.9% of Jets fans and was the proper thing to do. The Jets needed new voices and a new philosophy on offense badly, which they will get with Schottenheimer gone, Bill Callahan gone to coach in Dallas, and wide receivers coach Henry Ellard also fired.

Secondly, it sounds like basically a done deal that former Miami Dolphins head coach Tony Sparano will becoming the Jets new offensive coordinator. Sparano has an offensive line background and will favor a run heavy style that should please Rex Ryan. However, it is expected that former Kansas City Chiefs head coach Todd Haley could join the Jets offensive staff as an assistant head coach/passing game coordinator. Haley and Sparano are old friends who have expressed an interest in working together. The combination sounds good on paper, but there is always dangers in having too many voices in the room.

Finally, Manish Mehta dropped this bomb in the Daily News this morning, where unnamed players and sources around the organization rip Mark Sanchez to pieces, basically saying he is coddled by the organization, doesn’t have great practice habits, and that the team should replace him with Peyton Manning if possible. I will go into more detail on this later in the day, but it is always a cowardly move to throw quotes to the media without putting your name behind it. The debate will now rage, who said these things? How much validity is there to them? Can Sanchez really be brought back as a starter?

It will be a busy day Jets fans, stay tuned.

LEAKED: Brian Schottenheimer’s Resume

TOJ has acquired a copy of the resume Brian Schottenheimer is using for his head coaching interviews

Due to my terrific inside sources around the New York Jets organization, I have been able to acquire a copy of the resume Brian Schottenheimer is using on his head coaching interviews.

Overview of Strengths

  • Ability to coach a mediocre offense, with either a competent veteran (Chad Pennington), a top ten draft pick (Mark Sanchez), or a future Hall of Famer (Brett Favre) at quarterback.
  • Can receive constant praise for innovation due to confusing calls and despite me never breaking tendencies.
  • Can get away with calling 67 passes in a run first offense, without my head coach even noticing.
  • My offense allows for 75% of our fans to call out the play before it is ran.

Offensive Philosophy

  • On every single play, split my fullback out in the slot and motion him into fullback even though I know everybody knows he isn’t staying in the slot and will motion in.
  • Also sub in a specific receiver who is bigger and can block so I can motion him in towards the formation on all running plays.
  • Sub out four or five players on every play, we need a specific group to throw with and a specific group to run with.
  • Use all of these motions and subbing to confuse my offense, so we can have multiple false start penalties and delay of games, along with blowing timeouts frequently.
  • Never, ever throw the football down the field outside the hashes. The entire game takes place within 5 yards of the quarterback, inside of the hash marks.
  • Ignore the running game when it is working. Ignore the passing game when it is working.
  • Run stretch plays with my slowest running back in 2nd and short to set up 3 and 5.
  • Run 4 yard crossing routes on 3rd and 9.
  • Do not use explosive players enough – see Leon Washington, Joe McKnight.

Highlights

  • Needed my team to call timeout before the first play of the game, even though we had the first play scripted all week.
  • Dropped Mark Sanchez back 67 times against the New York Giants pass rush, when we were averaging 5 yards per carry.
  • Played Matthew Mulligan 25 snaps per game for an entire season.

Favorite Plays

  • Shotgun 4-wide, throw a 4 yard hook route to the tight end, usually on 3rd and long.
  • Motion receiver towards the formation and run toss, usually for a 3 or 4 yard loss.
  • Play action boot on 2nd and short out of the same formation, where the quarterback only has the option to throw to the tight end in the flat.
  • Slant. Slant. Slant.

Standard Drives

  • 1st and 10 – Run the football for a 1 yard gain.
  • 2nd and 9 – Throw 4 yard hook route to tight end.
  • 3rd and 5 – Throw 3 yard crossing route.
  • 1st and 10 – Run the football for a 7 yard gain.
  • 2nd and 3 – Go shotgun, get the quarterback sacked.
  • 3rd and 12 – Draw or check down to running back.
  • 1st and 10 – Throw slant for 8 yards
  • 2nd and 2 – Play action boot, quarterback rolls out, throws incompletion.
  • 3rd and 2 – Shotgun, sack or incompletion.

New York Jets: Assessing The Situation After Yesterday’s Nightmare

Where do the Jets go from here?

Third and ten from the 1 yard line. The New York Jets held a 7-3 lead and had put together an encouraging performance so far. One ten yard out route, two missed tackles, a poor angle, and 99 yards later. The game was over. If you have watched the Jets this season, you knew at that moment they didn’t have the character or the team this year to overcome that type of play.

I remember from the Oakland game when they couldn’t bounce back from a muffed kick. I remember from the New England game when they were ripping down the field on the opening drive but had to settle for a short field goal, which they missed and couldn’t bounce back from it. I remember defenders purposely staying on blocks to avoid tackling Tim Tebow on Denver’s game winning drive. I remember last week when a Santonio Holmes fumble gave the Eagles a quick 7-0 lead and the Jets didn’t have an answer.

The 2011 New York Jets don’t have the fight they did last year. They don’t have that irrational confidence that made them such a dangerous team in Rex Ryan’s first two years. The problems started in the off-season, which we will look back on as one of Mike Tannenbaum’s worst and it has carried through with a disappointing defense and a perplexing awful offense led by the perpetually incompetent Brian Schottenheimer.

Yesterday was the final nail in Schottenheimer’s coffin. Rex Ryan can lavish all the false praise on him that he wants but this team can’t be managed through his rose colored glasses. Change is needed and the first move this off-season must be letting Schottenheimer go and putting a competent NFL offense together.

Mark Sanchez was bad yesterday…very bad, yet we need to see him with a new offensive coordinator in a system that plays to his strengths. The strategy to drop him back 65+ times and only throw 6 yard passes inside the hash marks doesn’t work. Get the guy a NFL quality right tackle and help at the skill positions, where the Jets are good but lack explosion. Forget about the Peyton Manning pipe dream rumors, you want to focus on a big move the Jets should make? Go get Maurice Jones-Drew or Matt Forte. I like Shonn Greene but can you think of one game changing play he has made all season?

The Jets offense doesn’t make big plays. Part of that is on Schottenheimer. Part of that is on Sanchez. Part of it is on their receivers not getting the necessary separation, breaking the necessary tackles and their running backs never ripping off big runs. Everything seems so hard for this offense. It is time to rebuild it.

The defense is solid but not spectacular and they won’t be until they improve at safety and linebacker. As you could imagine this will be a huge off-season for Mike Tannenbaum who needs to sit down and honestly assess the talent level on this roster, which is that of a borderline .500 team not that of a team who will win a division and host a playoff game.

It is easy to be down and throw around hysterics about Sanchez and Rex Ryan being on the hot seat. Even his biggest supporter can admit Rex came off like like an idiot yesterday and his words are starting to ring hollow. Ultimately, he is who he is but that kind of embarrassment is hard to shake off. Can Rex and his team rise off the mat? Only time will tell but you are kidding yourself if you think both Rex and Sanchez won’t be back next year and yes the year after.

Think about how awful you feel like the Jets are right now and then remember they are 8-7 and not 3-12. They aren’t that far away. Some years aren’t going to end in playoff berths and two upset playoff wins. This year hurts more because they were swept by New England and lost to the Giants and because just like it is more enjoyable to watch the Jets win because of Rex Ryan and his antics, it is more painful to watch them them lose because of Rex Ryan and his antics.

Rex Ryan Deserves Some Blame For Jets Struggles On Offense

Chris Celletti on why the Jets offensive struggles fall both on Brian Schottenheimer AND Rex Ryan

I’m as guilty of it as the next disgruntled Jets fan. On December 4, 2011 at 1:47 PM, sometime during the first or second quarter of the Jets-Redskins game, I tweeted the following:

“I hate Brian Schottenheimer. That’s all.”

Hate is a bit of a strong word. I don’t hate the man. He seems like a hard-working guy who takes his job seriously. Other than make me grow some gray hairs because I care about the Jets way too much, he really hasn’t done anything to m e.

But I probably tweeted that after a failed tight end screen, a wildcat call on 3rd and 4 (even if it was successful) or a draw on 2nd and long. There are countless times during a Jet game when they are on offense when you could tweet something like “I hate Brian Schottenheimer”. That’s because, despite probably being a really nice guy who you’d like to play golf with, Brian Schottenheimer is a bad offensive coordinator.

But blaming a coordinator is the thing football fans do the best. The Eagles are 4-8, why? Juan Castillo, thats’ why! The Giants have lost four in a row? Perry Fewell has lost his way! Us Jets fans are especially great at it, whether it be Schottenheimer, Mike Heimerdinger (I’ve decided that the next time the Jets make an awful play call on offense, it should be known as a “Schottenheimerdinger”), Paul Hackett, Bob Sutton…the list doesn’t end. And yes, sometimes it is warranted. But it is also an easy way out.

I love Rex Ryan and what he’s brought to the Jets. Sure, sometimes I wish he’d keep his mouth shut, sometimes I wish he’d learn to manage a clock a little bit better, but on the whole I’m more than pleased with Rex leading the Jets. My biggest concern with Ryan is that he’s a defensive coordinator masquerading as a NFL head coach. Ryan has such a love for “his” defense (in case you were wondering, he’ll remind you every time he can that it…”his”) that the offensive suffers. ESPN analyst and memory-less former Super Bowl-winning quarterback Steve Young has consistently stuck on this premise when discussing the Jets, and I think it has a lot of credence.

My next tweet after the in-the-moment Schottenheimer blast mentioned something about getting sick of Rex Ryan-Ball. What’s Rex Ryan-Ball? It is what we’ve seen from the Jets since the home loss to the Patriots in Week 10. It is about doing anything, everything, at all costs, NOT to turn the ball over. Rex Ryan-Ball would rather win a game 13-10 with no turnovers in a nail-biter than win 31-20 by taking a few chances. It is all about the defense. Get my defense on the field at the end of the game with a lead, and we will win. Well, we saw how that worked in Denver, and if Stevie Johnson could catch, how it worked against Buffalo.

I guess you could say that it is smart football. Maybe you share Ryan’s opinion. Maybe that’s just how the Jets have to play. Maybe Sanchez would kill them with pick-six after pick-six if they simply let him chuck the ball all over the place. But Rex Ryan-Ball works best if you have a truly dominant defense, if your running game is elite. The 2000 Ravens, the 85 Bears. Once in a lifetime type of teams. I don’t know if Ryan has got this memo yet, but it is week 13 and the Jets have neither a dominant defense or a good running game this season.

Just know that next time you destroy Schottenheimer for a crappy play call, he has a hulking head coach right behind him, perhaps drilling this style of football into his brain. Do we honestly think that if Ryan wanted to throw the ball downfield more, Schottenheimer wouldn’t listen to him? Would he really disregard his boss? If this in fact does happen, and Ryan has literally no say in offensive matters, then that’s a really big problem. We all know he’s a defensive guy, and you can’t change his defensive football upbringing. But the best coaches in football — Tom Coughlin, Bill Belichick, Mike Tomlin — have full command of their sideline. If Tom Coughlin wants to blitz on a specific play, guess what? The Giants will blitz. If Belichick wants to fake a punt? They’re doing it. And it’s likely that Rex does have a say in the offensive style the Jets play, which is why when they struggle to move the ball, you can’t point JUST at Schotty.

And that brings us to this Sunday’s game against the Kansas City Chiefs. The Chiefs will throw Tyler Palko at the Jets. Tyler freaking Palko, probably the worst quarterback to start an NFL game this season. I, for one, am fascinated to see how the Jets play this thing. For 55 minutes, the Jets were in a dogfight with the Washington Redskins, a bad football team with nothing to play for. The Jets didn’t try to jump on them, get a lead, and stomp on their throats. They were content playing a one-possession game, where one mistake loses them the game. Thankfully, the mistakes came by the guys wearing maroon and gold, and the Jets made a couple big plays. But how often can you count on that to happen?

I want to see the Jets come out guns blazing and give the Chiefs zero hope. I want to see them take the opening kick (stop deferring Rex, “your” defense keeps getting gashed early in games), march down the field and score, force a turnover and score again and put the game out of reach early. At home, the Jets CAN do that against the Chiefs. I hope they do. I think most Jet fans hope they do? Will Rex let them?

Prediction – It will be more of the same. I think the Jets win, and that’s because the Chiefs with Palko at quarterback are one of the worst offensive football teams in a very long time. But my dream of a 31-9 thrashing will probably be just that — a dream. I think they do it the way Rex wants it. Sanchez won’t put up big stats. They’ll try (mostly unsuccessfully) to run the ball. They’ll get some points off turnovers (I’m not sure if we’ve mentioned this yet, but Tyler Palko is really bad). They’ll win something like 20-10. Maybe 17-13 even. I wish the Jets would finally go out and beat up an inferior opponent. I just don’t see it happening.

New York Jets: What Does More Moore Mean?

What does Tom Moore’s “promotion” mean for the New York Jets offense the rest of the year?

The talk of this week has been the decision of the New York Jets to keep offensive consultant Tom Moore with the team full time the rest of the season. Moore had originally been working part time, only occasionally showing up for practices and games, including an appearance in the booth last week versus Washington.

As you would expect, the coaching staff and players talk in reverential terms of Moore’s presence and the speculation is swarming about Brian Schottenheimer’s job security.

What should we really make of this decision?

Personally, I think this is simply an all hands on deck situation. The Jets need to run the table, so why not make sure you are going to get the absolute most out of all your assets? At this point of the year, Moore won’t be touching any of the play-calling duties. You don’t switch the chain of command like that at this point. However, you hope that he is playing a more active part in constructing the game plan and designing specific plays to help jumpstart the Jets passing game, particularly by getting better use out of tight end Dustin Keller.

For the long term, it is hard to get a read on Schottenheimer’s job status. We all know his contract runs for two more seasons but that certainly doesn’t mean the Jets can’t fire him. If this team doesn’t make the playoffs, they are going to need shake something up and Schottenheimer is the sensible fall guy. I don’t think Moore is taking over as a full time coordinator at this point of his career but he could weigh in on the hiring process while remaining in a consultant role.

For the immediate future, I would hope to see more Dustin Keller and better creativity in certain situations (maybe some more down field shots) but ultimately this is stil Schottenheimer’s offense, so expect the same inconsistencies and frustrations.

Last Second Reminders For Brian Schottenheimer

A few last second reminders for New York Jets offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer

1. You are allowed to throw a pass over 10 yards. It is both legal and your quarterback has the arm strength to do it.

2. There are other pass routes besides the slant. There are even these crazy new things, called double-move routes which make defenders think you are running a short route, which they sit on and like to return for interceptions, and then actually turn into deep routes that go for big plays. A slant and go. An out and up. A stop and go. A post corner.

3. No more direct snaps to the running back.

4. Stop with the boot route in the flat to Dustin Keller.

5. Whenever you bring Patrick Turner in the game and motion him towards the formation, everybody knows a toss is coming.

6. Just cause I said stop the boot route, doesn’t mean you should continue to ignore Dustin Keller in the way you have. We don’t want to hear excuses about defenses keying on him. Defenses key on Rob Gronkowski every week and he still manages to catch two touchdowns every game.

7. Santonio Holmes is fast. He can go deep.

8. Joe McKnight runs well in space. Throw him a screen.

9. Matthew Mulligan is awful. Stop playing him.

A Vent On The New York Jets Offense

A much needed vent on the New York Jets offense after last night’s performance

Let’s start with something comforting

Despite a recent rough patch of games, Mark Sanchez still is on the exact same pace that Eli Manning was on to start his career and we see how Eli has turned out. Sanchez is not without blame, he is inconsistent, inaccurate and gets jittery in the pocket.

However, I am still of the belief that he has the physical tools and leadership abilities to be the quarterback on a Super Bowl winning team. Everything he has accomplished the past two years doesn’t get swept under the rug. He needs to get better, now…but the potential is there to be a good to very good NFL quarterback.

I haven’t went crazy on the Brian Schottenheimer hate bandwagon but it is now clearer than ever that he needs to be fired at the season’s end, if not immediately. This is a team that has been thoroughly mediocre on offense through six years and four quarterbacks (Chad Pennington, Kellen Clemens, Brett Favre, Mark Sanchez) with Schottenheimer designing and calling plays.

It is time to see if Mark Sanchez can improve in a new system. A system that somewhat resembles a NFL offense.

Right now the Jets offense is completely predictable and limited. I have watched every snap of the Schottenheimer era and I can call out exactly what the Jets are running at least 25-30 times a game depending on the situation, formation, and field position. I am a digital salesperson, who runs a website on the side that played Division 3 football. What do you think people like Bill Belichick can figure out after breaking down Jets game tape?

Maybe this is a slight exaggeration but at the moment it appears the only two pass plays the Jets run are slants and the occasional boot to Dustin Keller that everybody always sees coming for 3 yards. They refuse to push the ball vertically down the field, which allows defenses to sit on the Jets short routes and jump them. I know Mark Sanchez has the ability to complete long passes down the field, I have seen him do it plenty of times. Where are the double moves? Where are the deep posts?

The problems go beyond Schottenheimer and Sanchez, starting with an offensive line that can’t consistently protect and a very average rushing attack.

The Jets need a new right tackle. They need a new backup tight end. They need a tall, vertical threat at receiver. They honestly may need a new primary running back because I am not sold on Shonn Greene yet. When is a runner on this team going to break a 50 yard run? When is somebody going to take a screen pass for 70?

However, first and foremost they need a new offensive coordinator and a complete change of direction. Schottenheimer is going to finish the season out and that is what it is. We can only hope people like Bill Callahan and Tom Moore can bring some type of influence that creates an offense that resembles ones like others in the NFL.