Ryan Fitzpatrick & Bryce Petty – The Fallacy Of The Bridge QB

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A common component of the argument to bring Ryan Fitzpatrick back in 2015 back was buy levitra 5mg x 4 that he was an ideal “bridge” quarterback to recent draft picks Bryce Petty and Christian Hackenberg. Upon closer examination does this actually make any sense and could the presence of Fitzpatrick actually harm the growth of the Jets two young quarterbacks, particularly Petty? Let’s take a closer look…

Ryan Fitzpatrick is often mischaracterized as a quarterback. He is not a game manager. He does not protect the football. He does not have an understanding of how to read defenses. He does not play particularly smart. The reason Fitzpatrick has stayed in the league for so long is because he is a streak shooter, capable of occasional stretches of strong play. When he is at his best, he is a playmaker, who makes things happen outside the scope of the offense and allows his receivers to make one on one plays. While I hate to use this term, he is a gunslinger. Think of Fitzpatrick as a really, really poor man’s Brett Favre, without the arm strength. He has the skill set to be a backup and spot starter, which is why he has been on 4,000 different teams in 11 years.

The habits he demonstrates on the field, and in this past offseason, off the field are not ideal to be handing down to a player like Bryce Petty, who already has enough to overcome. Let’s be clear, Petty is going to sink or swim because of himself but everything he is likely to have “picked up” from Fitzpatrick is not going to help him become a competent NFL starter.

Fitzpatrick has a habit of locking on to one receiver, usually Brandon Marshall, and ignoring what the rest of the defense is showing him. Before the snap, Fitzpatrick has decided he is throwing to Marshall no matter what and doesn’t see or care about the one high safety who intercepts this pass.

Petty also has a habit of locking on to one receiver, usually Robby Anderson (who had 12 targets on Monday night), and ignoring what the rest of the defense is showing him. Before the snap, Petty has decided he is throwing to Anderson no matter what and doesn’t see or care about the one high safety who intercepts the pass.

When he pre-determines throws, Fitzpatrick also regularly misses underneath defenders. This is about as mentally sloppy you can play the quarterback position. To be blunt, this is stupid football, no matter where you studied economics over a decade ago.

Petty’s second interception the other night showed a similar issue. He pre determined a throw to Anderson, thinking it was cover 3 with the corner bailing, so he’d have him on the comeback route. However, he forgets the underneath defender who easily intercepts him after Petty stares down his target from the second he receives the snap.

On the field, Petty has watched Fitzpatrick ignore his reads and regularly blindly chuck the football into coverage. Off the field, he watched Fitzpatrick hold out the entire offseason, while admittedly not staying in shape, and then walk into camp day one and be handed a job. He also watched Fitzpatrick play poorly and then call out the team’s leadership for questioning him after he was benched.

So basically the Jets “bridge” QB is reckless with the football, thinks he is entitled to a job despite playing poorly and regularly does not progress through his reads. Let’s hope Petty forgets everything mostly everything he has “learned” from Fitzpatrick in the past year.

Photo Credit: NewYorkJets.com