No Huddle – New York Jets 2nd Half Run Edition

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TJ Rosenthal kicks off another week of New York Jets coverage at Turn On The Jets with his weekly No Huddle - Make sure to give TJ a follow on Twitter on Turn On The Jets a follow on Facebook.

Bet you didn’t think that by the time bye week rolled around, the Jets would be 5-4 thanks to wins over the Falcons, Pats and Saints. There is the old Bill Parcells saying that “you are what your record says you are.” What about the notion too, that a team’s true ultimate potential can be based upon the quality of opponent in victory. These 2013 Jets have that part covered. The bar is slowly raising by the week it seems. As the club enters the break hoping to stop the on and off pattern. Prior conversation about a lack of overall talent at the start of the year is slowly turning towards how the Jets can simply stay consistent. A much more promising dilemma to try and correct, given the choice.

The Perfect Formula

It doesn’t always works the way it’s drawn up during the week, but a ball secure and dominant run game, a killer pass rush, aided by a huge improvement overnight by the secondary, was the correct road to travel. To see all three come to fruition all at once was a joy for Jet fans. It was the perfect scientific formula for how to beat a potent 6-1 Saints club, designed in the lab by Rex Ryan and the staff. This time, unlike the debacle in Cincinnati, there were no damaging downfield explosions during the field test, that got in the way.

Milliner Makes His “Debut”

THAT was the Dee Milliner who was touted by many as a top corner ready to start as a rookie. Milliner closed confidently on Saints receivers routes, competed in airspace for the ball, and played physically when it was the right time to do so.

We give Rex Ryan a ton of credit for going public in his faith regarding the kid’s talent after the Bengal disaster. While some were beginning to wonder whether he had what it takes to be a big leaguer. Including yours truly.

Send In The Clones

Have you noticed how teams with potent offenses seem to able to replace injured weapons with backups who own similar attributes? The Jets played without big TE Jeff Cumberland but no need to worry. Zach Sudfeld turned up-field like he was 5’11, not 6’7. They lost reliable Jeremy Kerley midway through yesterday’s game but then another recently acquired player
in Greg Salas showed off his dangerous speed burst after the catch. One that kept the WR screen a powerful tactic. Weeks back Marty Mornhinweg replaced the concept of Mike Goodson’s speed with the playmaking talents of Josh Cribbs.

While analysts note that teams who have fallen to the Jets have done so in part to the loss of certain players, the Jets continue to make no excuses about injuries. Sending in the clones instead. It’s called depth. Anyone with dreams of playing beyond Christmas must have it. John Idzik, you’re a stealth bomber.

Nice Adjustment Marty

Marty Mornhinweg put the ball in the air three times on the goal line white Chris Ivory was red hot early in the game. The decision resulted in a FG and a 7-3 deficit on what felt like a game tying TD drive. From there the Jets OC adjusted. A designed roll out scramble soon after, inside the New Orleans five yard line by Geno Smith, led to pay dirt. Later in the fourth quarter, a key run by Ivory on third and long shortened the field inside 50 yards for red hot K Nick Folk.

Ryan and Mornhinweg, even with a natural desire to do certain things as coordinators with their units, based many key choices yesterday on what was taking place right then and there. Marty took the air out of the ball when it was clear the ground was clear for the taking. Ryan let the front seven eat after recognizing that they were getting the type of heat on Drew Brees that didn’t require too many all out blitzes that included corners.

It was Mornhinweg’s commitment to the run which limited too much risk taking by the rookie Smith, that allowed Rex’s crew to take the game over.

4 thoughts on “No Huddle – New York Jets 2nd Half Run Edition

  1. Milliner definitely had his best game – actually, his only good game, there were still some issues though. It was also hard to believe he didn’t get one hand on that deflected near-interception, that ended up a completion and first down for NO. Definitely a big step in the right direction though.

  2. I think Milliner’s play of the game was on Meachem’s long gain. Cromartie was marking Meachem and slipped. Catching up to Meachem and holding him for Allen to bring him down, preventing the touchdown, was downright impressive.

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