Turn On The Jets 12 Pack – All Geno Smith Edition

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The Turn On The Jets 12 Pack is back, with an edition focusing solely on New York Jets quarterback Geno Smith. 

1. My pre-draft opinions of Geno Smith are documented here and here. I thought he was strong value at #39 and was happy the Jets didn’t use one of their first round picks on him or sacrifice any picks to move up for him in the 2nd round. Prior to the draft I wrote this -

In the proper situation, Smith should be a productive starter in this league with the potential to develop into a Pro-Bowler. He remains rough around the edges and if put in the wrong situation, shouldn’t be expected to immediately turn around a bad team.

The importance of the Jets grooming him properly was discussed here and if the Jets don’t put too much on his plate this season, he should be fine. This will be a run heavy offense that emphasizes a high amount of screen passes and quick releases to the outside, which plays to Smith’s strengths. It is a good thing the Jets have Marty Mornhinweg running the offense, as he will help Smith’s development in the coming years.

2. I do think Smith is going to be the day one starter. In 2009, Rex Ryan started Mark Sanchez despite him having 1 year of college starting experience and having a good, but far from great summer. Geno Smith has 3 years of college starting experience and I do think he is capable of having a good enough summer that Rex will be comfortable enough to start him. He will have the backing of the front office who will be anxious to see Smith play and move past Mark Sanchez and his contract situation. I have been a noted “Sanchez Apologist” for years at this site and I wouldn’t be stunned if he had a better than expected summer but he’d really need to be leaps and bounds more competent than Smith to get the day one job.

3. I don’t buy any argument that is based on the notion that Smith shouldn’t start his rookie year “because the Jets started Sanchez his rookie year and look what happened!” Everybody who says that now was saying it was a GENIUS move to start Sanchez his rookie year after he had just outplayed Tom Brady in New England for a divisional round playoff win. Sanchez’s issues had nothing to do with starting too soon. They had to do with his own shortcomings coupled with the Jets doing a poor job of building around him, particularly in 2011 and 2012. Smith and Sanchez are different people in different situations. If you hypothetically sit Smith all year on a team that is likely going to be .500 or worse no matter who is at quarterback, what do you do if you are in position to select a quarterback in the top 5-12 of next year’s draft? You would have no notion of what kind of player Smith could be and will be making an uninformed decision.

4. I buy none of the diva talk surrounding Smith. We’ve already discussed how overblown the agent story was and by all accounts Smith is about as high of a character guy as you can find. If he has issues in the NFL, I doubt they will be because he is a “diva.” For the record, most of the garbage you hear about Mark Sanchez’s personality is false as well. Everybody who I have ever discussed him with around the team and who has interacted with him had nothing but positive things to say about his work ethic and personality. He has been an awful quarterback on the field the past year and a half, it doesn’t mean he is a lazy, entitled jackass who never pushes himself.

5. We actually got word from a source the morning of round 2 of the NFL Draft that “there was no way the Jets were leaving the night without Geno Smith,” we hinted at it in this article and on Twitter that day but weren’t 100% sold that it was accurate…clearly it was. The source had indicated that the Jets were heavily considering moving up 3-5 spots to grab him, which fortunately they didn’t have to do and that he was nearly taken with the 13th pick. It worked out well for Idzik and company that he lasted to 39, making him arguably one of the best value picks of the draft.

6. We know Geno Smith is considering Jay-Z and his newly formed sports agency. We only ask that he comes out of the the tunnel to this song…(and that Jay-Z handles his career better than he handled the career of Memphis Bleek).

7. We are going to dig deeper into Smith’s film in the coming month but his arm strength and accuracy in the short to medium game is terrific, along with the quickness of his release. He will need to get himself comfortable under center, improve his deep ball accuracy and his pocket presence, particularly when teams get a push up the middle because he’d show a bad tendency to throw off his back foot. Smith has the ability and athleticism to scramble effectively but doesn’t seek to run frequently.

8. A refresher on Smith’s numbers as a starter at West Virginia….

  • 2010 – 241/372, 64.8 completion percentage, 2,763 yards, 24 TDs, 7 INTs, 217 rushing yards
  • 2011 – 346/526, 65.8 completion percentage, 4,385 yards, 31 TDs, 7 INTs, -33 rushing yards
  • 2012 – 369/518, 71.2 completion percentage, 4,205 yards, 42 TDs, 6 INTs, 152 rushing yards

9. Some cut-ups worth watching

10. I fully expect Marty Mornhinweg to take advantage of Smith’s accuracy in the short game by utilizing a high amount of running back and tight end screens. Since Mike Goodson’s status is tenuous at best with the Jets right now, this opens the door back up for Joe McKnight to have a larger impact because of his ability to catch the football. Also look for plenty of slip and smoke screens to Santonio Holmes and Jeremy Kerley.

11. As of today, I’m betting Mark Sanchez starts the 1st pre-season game. Geno Smith starts the 2nd pre-season game…and then starts the critical 3rd pre-season game, seizing the opening day job.

12. How are you feeling about #7? Are you buying the jersey already Jets fans?

15 thoughts on “Turn On The Jets 12 Pack – All Geno Smith Edition

  1. I’m ALL IN on Geno!!! I think he’s just flat out a more talented QB than Sanchez. I just don’t think Sanchez is a good QB. I believe Geno is much more accomplished coming out of college and he’s going to shine if given a chance. We’ve all seen a lot of Sanchez over the years and he’s not impressive at all.

  2. I never expected Smith to fall to #39. He was a great pick at that spot. But I hated the pre-draft reports because they all said the Jets would trade up for him. That would have contradicted the BPA strategy. When you trade up, you are targeting a player.

    Smith should become a great QB. He at least has the tools to do so. But when he starts should be determined by when he is ready.

    It is all very simple: the Jets have coaches with direct contact with Smith. They will know when he is ready.

    To quote a book I’m reading: “most men only swim once able to.” Smith is a good QB, but he had some tendencies (everyone knows these; I do not have to list them all again) that need to be fixed. No one fixes them on the field. This is because they are counterintuitive.

    Sanchez has been slow in fixing these because he was thrown into the thick of it. Intuition keeps you alive and kicking on the field and Sanchez has a lot of instincts. But they are the wrong ones. He cannot fix them during the season because he cannot hesitate. So he makes a lot of bad decisions. He has to doubt himself and cannotallow himself to do so.

    Many professional athletes remove themselves from the sport to refine technique. Tennis, where technique is the most important aspect (an eight-yr-old has enough muscle mass to hit a tennis ball across the full court; the difficulty is in the combination of speed and accuracy) players regularly take time off to tweak the motions they have ingrained into their bodies for years. Slumps are most evident in sports like baseball and basketball, in which players cannot take a step back and work on their game. And the difference between a championship ring and a blown opportunity can be an ounce of lateral pressure.

    Geno needs to stop playing the game in order to play it well. So does Sanchez but someone needs to start. Everybody knows that you are not supposed to throw off your back leg, but how else do you protect yourself when a huge DT is screaming up the pocket? Everyone knows that you cannot stare down your receiver, but how else do you throw the ball into a tiny window? Smith or Sanchez can never play a game this year and the team will know which of them is ready when one of them overcomes these issues.

    But this is not something that goes away after a few drills. There is no need to rush.

    And as to drafting in the top 12 next year, all of those teams were eliminated before week 17, so Smith would have at least one game in that situation.

  3. Geno’s college numbers are actually better than Luck’s numbers. Of course you’ll never hear that from the media circus who is trying to paint Geno as another distraction. When he succeeds it will be even that much sweeter!

  4. Kudos to you Joe for such an incisive, through article. One of the most balanced observations and analysis Of Geno that I have seen to date. And the article was worthy of Kash’s thoughtful, sometimes even brilliant remarks. I frequently look to this site for the best in depth Jet reportage and it rarely lets me down.

  5. In reading comments on the web conventional wisdom says Geno has flaws and nneds to sit. But Geno’s flaws are not flaws that require him to sit on the sideline. Improving his deep ball accuracy a little, showing slightly better touch on short passes and not locking onto WR’s on occasion. These are rookies issues and while coaching will help, only playing can help eliminate these issues. IMO these issues won’t stop Geno from playing effectively right away.

    Geno has thrown almost 1500 passes in college and is NFL ready. Bring him along slowly in preseason and the 1st half of the season and then expand the playbook as the season progresses and I think he will have a very successful rookie season.

    I understand the sentiment about watching and that was good for Rodgers and would have been better for Sanchez. However both of those guys had very limited exp at the college level. In Geno we have a QB who is ready to play now (39 starts in college). Do we need to manage him early yes (the Seahawks and Redskins managed Wilson and RGIII early on) however as the season moves along because of is work ethic he should be able to improve and command more of the gameplan.

    Geno is not a limited QB and has all the tools you need to be successful. Forget about the losing streak in college if your team gives up 49, 55, 39, 55 and 50 points you would be lucky to win one of those games. This was a bad defense almost historically so for a team that still finished with a winning record. The O-line was poor and the running game pedestrian at best. If you look at Luck, Wilson and RGIII you will see that in games where their teams gave up a ton of points they did not have a good winning % either.

    In 2011 Luck’s teams gave up more 39 points three times. Luck’s record 1-2 and the game they won was in triple OT.

    Between 2010 and 2011 RGIII teams gave up more 39 points 14 times his team’s record was 5-9.

    To get a larger sample for Wilson his team’s were 1-3 in games where they gave up more than 33 points.

    Simply put if you look at these guys in these games you would say they have flaws and they couldn’t lead their teams but a closer look reveals all QB’s lose games when they have lousy defenses. So before we say Geno couldn’t lead his team and get them out of a slump, understand neither could any of these top prospects (who as Jets fans we would all love to have).

    Geno is a prospect who played on a very average team. But make no mistake Geno Smith is no average prospect.

  6. I am new to this board but have enjoyed reading the comments about Geno. I just happen to be a die-hard WVU fan (my alma mater) and a Jets fan living here in Jersey.

    I was thrilled that the Jets drafted Geno and I think he will do well. There are some issues of attitude perhaps (i.e., in the Texas game last year, he interacted negatively with fans in the stadium and did the “hook’em down” horns sign…) Things like that are immature, but he’s a kid and he will grow up. Go Mountaineers and GO Jets!!! J-E-T-S Jets Jets Jets!!!

  7. On an average team? WVU was not Alabama, and not an SEC school, but Geno’s three top receivers are in the NFL. One of his WR was drafted #8 overall. They also did not exactly play NFL-level or even SEC-level teams. And with a passing offense, with top-level receivers, Geno was kept to two passing touchdowns or less in four of those six losses. But this gives the illusion to the lie that someone cares that Geno lost games in college or what his stats were.

    Let’s take a look at our rival, Tom Brady. Tom Brady is a great QB with ice in his veins. He took a nap before his first Super Bowl. He rarely panics or even gets nervous. This makes whatever he does smooth. The antithesis of jerky, twitchy, badly timed, full of nervous ticks, and prone to make mistakes is just about everything you need from a QB. Few QBs are as stone cold as Brady, but almost all the great QBs are even in their motions and their transitions.

    Geno Smith is not Brady. Smith is known to react emotionally in games, just like the rest of humanity. This is not an issue. But it does mean Smith needs more training than Brady to conquer his nerves. If Brady does not throw off his back leg, it is partially because of training, but also because his state of mind allows him to ignore oncoming pressure. When Smith will get the snap and see his pocket collapsing, he will naturally react to it. This means his throws will be different depending on if he feels pressured or not. He needs to learn how to make the same throw regardless of the situation.

    This is even more difficult that it sounds. Adrenaline rushes into your blood. Your vision narrows. Your muscles contraction becomes jerkier, more sudden. Your concept of time changes as your brain goes into overdrive and processes everything faster. Your body starts to stiffen to prepare for impact. And it is in this moment that Geno needs to remember to keep his weight on the front foot.

    What most do not understand is that panic turns the most brilliant individual into a fool because it is all about an ingrained list of priorities. It is like a to-do list which you absolutely cannot deviate from, no matter how much sense there is in doing item #1 and #8 at the same time. This list has to be remade so that the 300-pound pass-rusher about to hit you with a full ton of force is consistently the fifteenth thing you account for.

    This is just one of the problems of panic. Tunnel-vision means that you miss obvious coverage, as well as need to stare at your receiver (otherwise you will have no idea where he is). Muscle-twitch and stiffness means that calculating the strength to put into a throw or the timing needed to escape a sack becomes harder.

    These are all issues Geno has had problems with. This is what differentiates him from Luck. It is not as simple as just taking snaps from under center. Geno was in the shotgun most of the time; his offense avoided putting him under pressure or closer to pass rushers. These are all things that he can overcome, but nothing on his college tape suggests he is close to doing so or has had to before.

  8. As ususal KAsh you miss the point and try to look at one statement to try to prove your point is accurate even when it is not. I did not call you out this time simply posted my own thoughts but you still responded (which I don’t mind) but as always inaccurately.

    Geno Smith O-line below average, RB’s average, Defense one of the worst. I did not mention his WR’s because everyone knows he had a stellar group. They also had a stellar QB. They also played some good teams please look at Texas A&M an average Big 12 school was excellent in the SEC. Let’s not act like the Big 12 cannot compete with the SEC.

    Geno throws off his back foot sometimes so do, some of the best QB’s in history. He also stands tall in the pocket and does not bail when under pressure. He climbs the pocket as well as any college QB I have studied in the last ten years. He stays poised and steps into throws in the face of pressure much more often then he fades away.

    Lastly let’s compare Geno to Tom Brady (who also flinches in the face of pressure at times) a Hall of Famer. Brady is great but he bails on throws and will duck and chuck from time to time.

    You are making a lot of wild conclusions based on what not really sure. I have watched the tape and watched games of geno and see a guy going up against defenses who knew he had to pass. Last I checked that is when it is hardest.

    I put up the stats of the other QB’s to illustrate that no matter who you are if teams know what you have to do it becomes harder to execute. None of the great prospects played there best consistently in these games where the defense knew what was coming because there defenses where being manhandled.

    Please go watch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsfBm1K0nhk.

    You will see the good and the bad and be able to see that this guy is a truly top notch QB prospect who is ready to start day one. Period. Many QB’s have to learn proper footwork when throwing. The thing about Geno you cannot teach is he keeps his eyes downfield in the face of the rush. This is one of the most important traits a QB can have and he has it in spades. As Bart Scott would say can’t wait to see Geno get his chance.

  9. @Harold

    I am going to regret writing this. But you again said that I missed the point of what you wrote, so I thought I should point out why you make less points than you think you do.

    This is going to need a soundtrack. Here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Idr0hEvCR8c

    Here is how I see your comments:

    “In reading comments on the web conventional wisdom says Geno has flaws and nneds[sic] to sit.”

    This is not conventional wisdom, but it is the argument that I made in a long comment almost right before yours. This article disagreed with such a statement. So this must be in answer to me, but you are going to later write this:

    “I did not call you out this time simply posted my own thoughts but you still responded (which I don’t mind) but as always inaccurately.”

    Continuing:

    “But Geno’s flaws are not flaws that require him to sit on the sideline. Improving his deep ball accuracy a little, showing slightly better touch on short passes and not locking onto WR’s on occasion. These are rookies[sic] issues and while coaching will help, only playing can help eliminate these issues. IMO these issues won’t stop Geno from playing effectively right away.”

    I never heard those flaws associated with Smith. The flaws we are discussing are throwing off the back foot, decreased accuracy when under pressure, not stepping into the pocket, not being able to identify complex or concealed coverages, not being able to identify blitzes.

    “Geno has thrown almost 1500 passes in college and is NFL ready.”

    This is a non sequitur and is how most of your arguments are structured. The number of passes thrown has nothing to do with being NFL ready. Especially since all of these passes were thrown without fixing the above issues. Each poorly thrown pass is a detriment; it instills bad habits.

    “Bring him along slowly in preseason and the 1st half of the season and then expand the playbook as the season progresses and I think he will have a very successful rookie season.”

    Another irritating aspect. This is actually the continuation of the paragraph started by the previous sentence. In short, it does absolutely nothing to back up what was written before, which was already on shaky ground. All sense and logic in this paragraph has been chopped to bits. The syntax is all correct, so it sounds like it makes sense, but there the semantics is weak or non-existent.

    “I understand the sentiment about watching and that was good for Rodgers and would have been better for Sanchez. However both of those guys had very limited exp at the college level.”

    Non sequitur.

    “In Geno we have a QB who is ready to play now (39 starts in college).”

    Non sequitur.

    “Do we need to manage him early yes (the Seahawks and Redskins managed Wilson and RGIII early on) however as the season moves along because of is[sic] work ethic he should be able to improve and command more of the gameplan[sic].”

    The above three quotes are one paragraph. Another semantics nightmare.

    “Geno is not a limited QB and has all the tools you need to be successful.”

    A great point. It just needs to be flushed out. But you proceed to kick me in the nuts:

    “Forget about the losing streak in college if your team gives up 49, 55, 39, 55 and 50 points you would be lucky to win one of those games. This was a bad defense almost historically so for a team that still finished with a winning record. The O-line was poor and the running game pedestrian at best. If you look at Luck, Wilson and RGIII you will see that in games where their teams gave up a ton of points they did not have a good winning % either.”

    The two above quotes are all one paragraph. Here is the logic trail: Geno Smith is a good QB -> his team gave up a lot of points -> other QBs also had teams that gave up a lot of points. I do not even know where to start. Why are we talking about the side of the ball Geno DOES NOT play on?

    But these were the two points where you actually produced logical arguments: Geno had a bad team and other QBs tended to lose games where their defenses were overwhelmed. These were the two points I answered the first time.

    Let’s continue:

    “As ususal[sic] KAsh you miss the point and try to look at one statement to try to prove your point is accurate even when it is not.”

    This is not the first time you tell me this. But I have to ask: what are you talking about? I keep scratching my head and fear I will soon develop a bald spot.

    “Geno Smith O-line below average, RB’s average, Defense one of the worst[sic]. I did not mention his WR’s because everyone knows he had a stellar group. They also had a stellar QB.”

    My point was that a stellar QB with a stellar receiving corps should have been able to put up more than two passing touchdowns on four of his six losses. As always, it was unanswered. And you say I ignore points.

    “They also played some good teams please look at Texas A&M an average Big 12 school was excellent in the SEC. Let’s not act like the Big 12 cannot compete with the SEC.”

    Non sequitur. WVU never played Texas A&M in history, as far as I can tell, and implying that because they were both average in different years against the same teams Texas A&M is similar to WVU defies all logic, both theoretical and football-related.

    “Geno throws off his back foot sometimes so do,[sic] some of the best QB’s[sic] in history.”

    A non sequitur disguised as a logical statement. Example: “Geno misses passes. So do the best QBs in history.”

    “He also stands tall in the pocket and does not bail when under pressure. He climbs the pocket as well as any college QB I have studied in the last ten years. He stays poised and steps into throws in the face of pressure much more often then[sic] he fades away.”

    Geno’s pocket experience is undermined by his reliance on the shotgun formation. He faced less pressure. He did not have to step into the pocket as often. His offense centered on short throws, so pressure rarely reached him in time.

    “Lastly let’s compare Geno to Tom Brady (who also flinches in the face of pressure at times) a Hall of Famer. Brady is great but he bails on throws and will duck and chuck from time to time.”

    Where is the comparison? Just FYI: you are implying here that because Brady has an uncanny ability to avoid sacks and prolong plays that he is somehow worse than Geno.

    “You are making a lot of wild conclusions based on what not really sure[sic]. I have watched the tape and watched games of geno[sic] and see a guy going up against defenses who knew he had to pass. Last I checked that is when it is hardest.”

    WVU’s statistics for 2012: 537 passing attempts versus 461 rushing attempts. WVU ran the ball 46% of the time and averaged 4.8 YPC. I’m starting to wonder if you actually watched Geno’s games.

    I base my conclusions on a very basic formula: I expect everything good to diminish at the next level and everything bad to become more prominent. I look at the good and think if it will still be advantageous at the next level; I see the bad and look for signs that the prospect can overcome it. Smith will experience defenses that get paid an average of $60,000,000 a year to stop him. He needs to eradicate all the demons that plagued his losses.

    “I put up the stats of the other QB’s to illustrate that no matter who you are if teams know what you have to do it becomes harder to execute. None of the great prospects played there[sic] best consistently in these games where the defense knew what was coming because there[sic] defenses where being manhandled.”

    The statistics you put up do not show this. All they show is that teams have a hard time winning if a rival scores more than 39 points on them. Everything else is something that you read into the statistics.

    “Please go watch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsfBm1K0nhk.

    You will see the good and the bad and be able to see that this guy is a truly top notch QB prospect who is ready to start day one. Period. Many QB’s have to learn proper footwork when throwing. The thing about Geno you cannot teach is he keeps his eyes downfield in the face of the rush. This is one of the most important traits a QB can have and he has it in spades. As Bart Scott would say can’t wait to see Geno get his chance.”

    The video is a highlight reel. The “bad” parts of his game are in black and white. It shows one sack three whole times in different angles and speeds. And the dramatic soundtrack wants to influence me into feeling something I do not.

    Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4WnYE0p-_M

    This is a much better resource for evaluating Geno Smith. It is the full game of WVU against Texas Tech. Geno’s first loss of the 2012 season. Erratic throws under pressure. Throws off his back foot when the rush is coming. His effective offense is mostly limited to short passes, screens, and the ground game. Has some good deep throws and some that are off target. The longer he holds onto the ball before throwing it, the more he struggles. His successful deep throws are usually quick. One time early in the game, he threw when there were no defenders to stop him from running and getting the down; it was on fourth down and he missed. Had he run, WVU would not have been behind Texas Tech and might have won the game.

  10. Bravo for the attempt to go point by point. But you distorted the statements so it is pointless to respond to each so I will answer just two.

    You purposely slant the argument when it suits you. You try to show in your posts you grasp football but your statements prove otherwise.

    Point 1:
    The two above quotes are all one paragraph. Here is the logic trail: Geno Smith is a good QB -> his team gave up a lot of points -> other QBs also had teams that gave up a lot of points. I do not even know where to start. Why are we talking about the side of the ball Geno DOES NOT play on?

    I answered this in the paragraph if a team knows you need to throw it makes it difficult to win games. WVU allowed teams to march up and down the field yet you ask why are we talking about the other side of the ball. Because it impacts the offensive strategy perhaps?

    Point 2:
    WVU never played Texas A&M in history, as far as I can tell, and implying that because they were both average in different years against the same teams Texas A&M is similar to WVU defies all logic, both theoretical and football-related.

    Texas A&M moved to the SEC from the Big 12 (they were an average team at best in the Big 12). They played very well in their 1st season. My point was the SEC is a great conference but there are teams outside of the SEC that can compete in the SEC. Texas A&M was the team that defeated eventual national champion Alabama. So your statements about level of competition are not validated in earnest. The Big 12 has plenty of defensive talent that is drafted every year.

    KAsh I could easily break down the weak rebuttals you posted one by one but they are so weak they do merit further response.

  11. Dear Harold,

    I already told you that Geno relied much more on the run than it seems. If you can only complete a deep pass when the defense is struggling to stop the 80% of your offense that is runs and screens, then you do not have much of a deep ball. And that is Geno’s offense: great all around when the ground game and quick passes are going well, and poor when he must mix in forward passes.

    Some of the runaway games were on Geno’s head. He was stopped at the LoS and unable to generate an offense, exposing his defense.

    Next, here are the Big 12 players drafted in the first three rounds this year:

    #4 Lane Johnson
    #8 Tavon Austin
    #15 Kenny Vaccaro
    #39 Geno Smith
    #56 Arthur Brown
    #74 Terrance Williams
    #78 Marquise Goodwin
    #92 Stedman Bailey

    Note that there are only two defensive
    players. Where is that defensive talent?

    SEC players drafted in JUST THE FIRST ROUND:

    #2 Luke Joeckel
    #6 Barkevious Mingo
    #9 Dee Milliner
    #10 Chance Warmack
    #11 D.J. Fluker
    #13 Sheldon Richardson
    #17 Jarvis Jones
    #18 Eric Reid
    #23 Sharrif Floyd
    #29 Cordarelle Patterson
    #30 Alec Ogletree
    #32 Matt Elam

    This reads like some college fantasy team list. I did not think the SEC was this dominant until I did this list. And that is undeniable defensive talent.

    But this is how I feel after our chats:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKhEw7nD9C4

    Alright, we’ll call it a draw.

  12. KAsh… just apply for the TOJ writing job already. Your comments are longer than some of these articles. You know you want to. ;-)

  13. KAsh it is like a sick addiction you post things which prove little and still I respond. I feel like a parent trying to teach a wayward child hoping against hope this will be the time the lesson clicks and the light bulb goes off.

    I ask simply, how does posting the number of players drafted from a conference without context is move your argument along? Keep in mind 2 of your top six players were from the Big 12 just a season ago. I state this to say talent comes from all over the nation. If you look at some of the past drafts you will see that many SEC players have been over drafted. This happens to all conference whent they are the hot conference. Look at the Big 12 from the early 2000′s. But the if you look at the 2010 and 2011 drafts for the Big 12 this is not a conference devoid of talent. Every conference has good years and if you look objectively you will see that the Big 12 excellent players year in and year on the defensive side of the ball who will be (and are already) stars. Thanks for listening and hopefully learning. SMH

    P.S. Look at those drafts and you will some some studs from the Big 12 (SEC has some good players as well but the Big 12 has more impact players). Just food for thought.

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